UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 


 

FORM 10-K

 


 

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the fiscal year ended: December 31, 2021

OR

 

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the transition period from:                            to                            

 

Commission File Number   000-50009  

 

PACIFIC HEALTH CARE ORGANIZATION, INC.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Utah

87-0285238

(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)

(I.R.S. Employer I.D. No.)

   

1201 Dove Street, Suite 300

Newport Beach, California

92660

(Address of principal executive offices)

(Zip Code)

 

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (949) 721-8272

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

Title of each class

 

Trading symbol

 

Name of each exchange on which registered

None

 

N/A

 

N/A

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:

 

$.001 par value, common voting shares

(Title of class)

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.

 

Yes

No

 

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Exchange Act.

 

Yes

No

 

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the past 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.

 

Yes

No

 

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files).

 

Yes

No

 

 

 

 

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer ☐    Accelerated filer ☐  
Non-accelerated filer ☒  Smaller reporting company    
  Emerging growth company

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has filed a report on and attestation to its management’s assessment of the effectiveness of its internal control over financial reporting under Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (15 U.S.C. 7262(b)) by the registered public accounting firm that prepared or issued its audit report.

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).

 

Yes

No

 

 

The aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting common equity held by non-affiliates computed by reference to the price at which the common equity was last sold as of the last business day of the registrant’s most recently completed second fiscal quarter was approximately $5,546,745.

 

As of April 11, 2022, the issuer had 12,800,000 shares of its $.001 par value common stock outstanding.

 

Documents incorporated by reference:   None

 

 

 

 

Table of Contents

 

   

Page

PART I

     

Item 1.

Business

5

Item 1A.

Risk Factors

11

Item 1B.

Unresolved Staff Comments

19

Item 2.

Properties

19

Item 3.

Legal Proceedings

19

Item 4.

Mine Safety Disclosures

19

     

PART II

     

Item 5.

Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

20

Item 6.

Reserved

21

Item 7.

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operation

21

Item 7A.

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

32

Item 8.

Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

33

Item 9.

Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

48

Item 9A.

Controls and Procedures

48

Item 9B.

Other Information

49

Item 9C.

Disclosure Regarding Foreign Jurisdictions that Prevent Inspections

49

     

PART III

     

Item 10.

Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance

50

Item 11.

Executive Compensation

54

Item 12.

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters

57

Item 13.

Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence

59

Item 14.

Principal Accounting Fees and Services

59

PART IV

     

Item 15.

Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules

61

Item 16.

Form 10-K Summary

62

 

Signatures

63

     

 

 

 

 

PACIFIC HEALTH CARE ORGANIZATION, INC.

 

Throughout this annual report, unless the context indicates otherwise, the terms, “we,” “us,” “our” or the “Company” refer to Pacific Health Care Organization, Inc., (“PHCO”) and our wholly owned subsidiaries Medex Healthcare, Inc. (“Medex”), Medex Managed Care, Inc. (“MMC”) and Medex Medical Management, Inc. (“MMM”), and former subsidiaries Industrial Resolutions Coalition, Inc. (“IRC”), Medex Legal Support, Inc. (“MLS”) and Pacific Medical Holding Company, Inc. (“PMHC”).

 

CAUTIONARY STATEMENT REGARDING

FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

 

All statements other than statements of historical fact included herein and in the documents incorporated by reference in this annual report on Form 10-K, if any, including without limitation, statements regarding our future financial position, business strategy, potential acquisitions, budgets, projected costs, and plans and objectives of management for future operations, are forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. In some cases, forward-looking statements can be identified by terminology such as “anticipate,” “believe,” “continue,” “could,” “estimate,” “expect,” “forecast,” “future,” “intend,” “likely,” “may,” “might,” “plan,” “potential,” “predict,” “project,” “should,” “strategy,” “will,” “would,” and other similar expressions and their negatives.

 

Forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance and involve known and unknown risks and uncertainties, many of which may be beyond our control. Readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date hereof, and actual results could differ materially as a result of various factors. The following include some but not all of the factors that could cause actual results or events to differ materially from anticipated results or events:

 

 

economic conditions generally and in the industry in which we and our customers participate, including the effects resulting from international conflicts and rising domestic inflation;

 

the impact on our business of COVID-19, including the reduction of our customers’ workforces as a result of a variety of COVID-19-related causes, as well as government mandates and impacts on the workers’ compensation industry, the businesses of our customers and on the economy generally;

 

cost reduction efforts by our existing and prospective customers;

 

competition within our industry, including competition from much larger competitors;

 

business combinations among our customers or competitors;

 

legislative and regulatory requirements or changes which could render our services less competitive or obsolete;

 

our failure to successfully develop new services and/or products either organically or through acquisition, or to anticipate current or prospective customers’ needs;

 

our ability to retain existing customers and to attract new customers;

 

price increases;

 

cybersecurity and software system failures and breaches, or the imposition of laws imposing costly cybersecurity and data protection compliance;

 

disruptive technologies that could render our services less competitive or obsolete;

 

reductions in worker’s compensation claims or the demand for our services, from whatever source; and

 

delays, reductions, or cancellations of contracts we have previously entered.

 

For more detailed information about particular risk factors related to the Company, see Item 1A Risk Factors below.

 

Moreover, we operate in a very competitive and rapidly changing environment. New risk factors emerge from time to time and it is not possible for our management to predict all risk factors, nor can we assess the impact of all factors on our business or the extent to which any factor, or combination of factors, may cause actual results to differ materially from those contained in any forward-looking statements.

 

4

 

You should not place undue reliance on forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements are based on the beliefs of management as well as assumptions made by and information currently available to management and apply only as of the date of this report or the respective dates of the documents from which they incorporate by reference. Neither we nor any other person assumes any responsibility for the accuracy or completeness of forward-looking statements. Further, except to the extent required by law, we undertake no obligations to update or revise any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events, a change in events, conditions, circumstances or assumptions underlying such statements, or otherwise. We may also make additional forward-looking statements from time to time. All such subsequent forward-looking statements, whether written or oral, made by us or on our behalf, are also expressly qualified by these cautionary statements.

 

The following discussion should be read in conjunction with our audited consolidated financial statements and the related notes contained elsewhere in this annual report and in our other filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “Commission”).

 

PART I

 

ITEM 1.         BUSINESS

 

We are workers’ compensation cost containment specialists providing a range of services principally to California employers and claims administrators. The Company was incorporated under the laws of the state of Utah in April 1970, under the name Clear Air, Inc. The Company changed its name to Pacific Health Care Organization, Inc., in January 2001. In February 2001, the Company acquired Medex in a share for share exchange. Medex is a wholly owned subsidiary of the Company. Medex is in the business of managing and administering both Health Care Organizations (“HCOs”) and Managed Provider Networks (“MPNs”) in the state of California. Medex also offers Workers’ Compensation carve-out services, Medicare set-asides and expert witness testimony. In February 2012, we incorporated MMM in the state of Nevada, as a wholly owned subsidiary of the Company. MMM is responsible for overseeing and managing medical case management services. In March 2011, we incorporated MMC in the state of Nevada, as a wholly owned subsidiary of the Company. MMC oversees and manages the Company’s utilization review, medical bill review services, and lien representation services.

 

On October 19, 2021, we completed short-form mergers between PHCO and each of our wholly owned subsidiaries Industrial Resolutions Coalition (“IRC”), Medex Legal Support, Inc. (“MLS”), and Pacific Medical Holding Company (“PMHC”). As a result of the short-form mergers the separate existence of IRC, MLS and PMHC terminated and the business, assets and liabilities of those entities have been transferred to PHCO and, as appropriate to its other subsidiaries. We continue to offer the services of IRC and MLS through its other subsidiaries as described in the preceding paragraph. Following is our corporate structure as of December 31, 2021.

 

chart.jpg

 

 

 

5

 

Business of the Company

 

We offer an integrated and layered array of complimentary business solutions that enable our customers to better manage their employee workers’ compensation-related healthcare administration costs. We are constantly looking for ways to expand the suite of services we can provide our customers, either through strategic acquisitions or organic development.

 

Our business objective is to deliver value to our customers that reduces their workers’ compensation-related medical claims expense in a manner that will assure that injured employees receive high quality healthcare that allows them to recover from injury and return to gainful employment without undue delay.  According to studies conducted by auditing bodies on behalf of the California Division of Workers’ Compensation, (“DWC”) the two most significant cost drivers for workers’ compensation are claims frequency and longer than average treatment duration. Our services focus on ensuring timely medical treatment to reduce the claim duration and medical treatment costs.

 

Our services include two HCOs, MPNs, medical case management, utilization review, medical bill review, workers’ compensation carve-outs and Medicare set-aside services. We also provide lien representation and expert witness testimony, ancillary to our other services. We offer our services as a bundled solution, as standalone services, or as add-on services.

 

Our core services focus on reducing medical treatment costs by enabling our customers to share control over the medical treatment process. This control is primarily obtained by participation in one of our medical treatment networks. We hold several government-issued licenses to operate medical treatment networks. Through Medex we hold two of the total of seven licenses issued by the state of California to establish and manage HCOs within the state of California. We also hold approvals issued by the state of California to act as an MPN and currently administer 26 MPNs. Our HCO and MPN programs provide our customers with provider networks within which the customer has some ability to direct the administration of the claim. This is designed to decrease the incidence of fraudulent claims and disability awards and ensure injured employees receive the necessary back-to-work rehabilitation and training they need. Our medical bill and utilization review services provide oversight of medical billing and treatment requests, along with medical case management, which keeps medical treatment claims progressing to a resolution and assures treatment plans are aligned from a medical perspective.

 

Our customers include self-administered employers, insurers, third party administrators, municipalities and others. Our principal customers are companies with operations located in the state of California where the high cost of workers’ compensation insurance is a critical problem for employers, though we have processed medical bill reviews in several other states. Our provider networks, which are located only in California, are composed of providers experienced in treating worker injuries. 

 

Our business generally has a long sales cycle, typically eight months or more. Once we have established a customer relationship and enrolled employees of our customers, we anticipate our revenue to adjust with the growth or retraction of our customer’s employee headcount. Throughout the year, we expect new employees and customers to be added while others terminate for a variety of reasons.

 

Health Care Organizations

 

An HCO is a network of health care professionals specializing in the treatment of workplace injuries and in back-to-work rehabilitation and training of our customers’ employees. HCOs were created to appeal to injured workers, while providing substantial savings to the customers. In most cases, our HCOs give the customer up to 180 days of medical control in a provider network within which the customer can direct the administration of the claim. The injured worker may change physicians once during this period, but the worker may not leave the provider network. The increased length of time during which the customer has control over administration of the claim is designed to decrease the incidence of fraudulent claims and disability awards. The right for the customer to control treatment within a network is also based upon the notion that if the customer has input on medical treatment there will be more control over getting injured workers healthy and back on the job. One intended outcome of the HCO program is by the customer retaining input on treatment, the customer is better able to control total claim treatment costs and related workers’ compensation insurance premiums.

 

Our two HCO licenses (respectively referred to as “Medex HCO” and “Medex2 HCO”) allow us to provide comprehensive medical services throughout California. Our HCO networks are composed of medical providers experienced in treating worker injuries and have contracted with approximately 5,500 and 6,700 individual medical providers and clinics, respectively, as well as hospitals, and rehabilitation centers. Through these two networks, our customers can offer their injured workers a choice of enrolling in an HCO with a network managed by primary care providers which requires primary care physicians to make referrals to needed specialists or in an HCO where injured workers do not need any prior authorization to be seen and treated by specialists.

 

6

 

We are continually reviewing and enhancing our networks with provider additions and removals based on feedback from our customers, their claim’s administrators and from our internal processes. All network provider credentials are reviewed and approved by Medex.

 

Our HCO networks are required to be recertified every three years. The Medex HCO was scheduled to be recertified in March 2022 and the Medex2 HCO network was scheduled for recertification in October 2021. Due to delays at the DWC in processing license recertifications, our recertifications have been delayed; however, the DWC granted an extension to recertify both licenses through June 2022. We expect to receive both recertifications.

 

HCO guidelines impose certain medical oversight, reporting, information delivery and usage fees upon HCOs. These requirements increase the administrative costs and obligations on HCOs compared to MPNs, although the obligations and cost differentials between the two types of organizations have been narrowing over the past few years.

 

Medical Provider Networks

 

Like an HCO, an MPN is a network of health care professionals, but health care professionals participating in MPNs are not required to have the same level of medical expertise in treating workplace injuries. Under an MPN program the customer dictates which physician the injured employee will see for the initial visit. Thereafter, the employee has discretion to choose which physician in the network will continue treatment of the claim; employees, however, are limited to treatment by health care professionals within the MPN for the life of the claim, which is a benefit to our customers. While the injured employee is limited to treatment by health care professionals within the MPN for the life of the claim, the California MPN laws and regulations allow the injured employee to dispute treatment decisions, provide for second and third medical opinions, and then permit case review by an independent medical reviewer whose decision can result in the customer losing control over medical treatment of the employee.

 

Unlike our HCOs, our MPNs do not require our customers to pay annual enrollment fees, nor do they require our customers to comply with annual enrollment notice delivery requirements. As a result, there are fewer administrative costs to customers associated with an MPN program. This allows our MPNs to market their services at a lower cost to employers than our HCOs. For this reason, many customers may opt to use the less complicated MPN even though it provides customers fewer rights to control medical treatment of employee injury claims.

 

We have received approval for and currently administer 26 MPNs. Each MPN must be reapproved every four years.

 

HCO and MPN Hybrid Offering

 

As a licensed HCO and approved MPN, in addition to offering HCO and MPN programs, we are also able to offer our customers a combination of the HCO and MPN programs. Under this plan model a customer can enroll its employees in our HCO program, and then prior to the expiration of the 180-day treatment period under the HCO program, the customer can enroll its employee into our MPN program. This allows our customers to take advantage of both programs, which is what our HCO customers typically do. To our knowledge, Medex is currently the only entity in California offering this hybrid program.

 

Medical Case Management

 

Medical case management keeps medical treatment claims progressing to a resolution and assures treatment plans are aligned from a medical perspective. Medical oversight is a collaborative process that assesses, evaluates, coordinates, implements and monitors medical treatment plans and the options and services required to meet an injured worker’s health needs. Medical case managers act as liaisons between the injured worker, claims adjuster, medical providers and attorneys to achieve optimal results for injured workers and customers.

 

Our medical case management services are performed by nurses who are credentialed by the state and have expertise in various clinical areas and backgrounds in workers’ compensation matters. This combination allows our nurses the opportunity to facilitate medical treatment while understanding the nuances of workers’ compensation up to and including litigation. By utilizing these services our customers help assure that the injured worker receives quality medical treatment in a timely and appropriate manner to return the employee to work.

 

7

 

Workers Compensation Carve-outs

 

Certain employers can opt out of the standard workers’ compensation regulatory dispute resolution scheme through carve-out agreements that comply with state statutory and regulatory requirements. More specifically, carve-out agreements permit employers and employees to establish alternative dispute resolution arrangements to resolve disputes in the context of workers’ compensation. These carve-out agreements are made between employers and the collective bargaining units representing the employer’s covered employees.

 

Utilizing our knowledge of the friction in the California workers’ compensation system, and the objectives of employers and the unions, we assist in guiding the negotiation of legal agreements for the implementation of workers’ compensation carve-outs for California customers and provide services that reflect the parties’ agreement with regard to alternative dispute resolution arrangements. Under such carve-out agreements certain customers can access our HCOs, MPNs and medical case management program.

 

Utilization Review

 

Utilization review is designed to evaluate the medical necessity of proposed treatment by comparing medical treatment requests against accepted medical guidelines. Its purpose is to serve as a safeguard against payor liability for medical costs that are not medically appropriate or approved by the relevant medical and legal authorities. Reviews of medical treatment requests are conducted at the appropriate qualification level for the request by a nurse, peer-to-peer provider, a specialist or a medical director and within the timelines set by the relevant laws and regulations.

 

Medical Bill Review

 

Many states have adopted fee schedules, which regulate the maximum allowable fees payable under workers’ compensation for procedures performed by a variety of health treatment providers. However, many procedures are not covered by fee schedules and are still subject to review and negotiation. We provide professional analysis of medical provider services and equipment billing to ascertain proper reimbursement. Such services include, but are not limited to, coding review and re-bundling, confirming that the services are customary and reasonable, fee schedule compliance, out-of-network bill review, pharmacy review, and preferred provider organization repricing arrangements. These services can result in significant network savings. We currently process medical bill review in several other states. Out of state medical bill reviews typically are the result of an injured California employee moving to a different state, but who still requires medical care.

 

Lien Representation

 

When a worker is injured in the scope of employment the employer is required to provide workers’ compensation benefits, including medical treatment. If the medical treatment is not paid because the services were not authorized, or if the provider disputes the amount of reimbursement, the provider may file a lien against the workers’ compensation claim, which must be resolved by the employer. In these cases, we provide our customers lien representation services that include negotiation through litigation and petitions for reconsideration.

 

Expert Witness Testimony

 

As an ancillary service to our HCO and MPN services, we provide expert witness testimony before the California Workers Compensation Appeals Board. The fees we charge for this service include reimbursement of expert witness fees and travel and lodging expenses for all HCO customers except for one, whose fees are included in their monthly global fee.

 

Medicare Set-aside

 

We provide Medicare set-aside services for workers’ compensation claims which is a financial agreement that allocates a portion of a workers’ compensation settlement to pay for future medical services related to the work-place injury, illness, or disease. The purpose of the set-aside arrangement is to provide funds to the injured party to pay for future medical expenses that would not be covered by Medicare. This program affords our customers an effective way to overcome complications after settlement and avoids unnecessary costs attached to the claim.

 

8

 

Marketing, Customers and Pricing

 

We provide services to virtually any size employer in the state of California as well as insurers, third party administrators, self-administered employers, municipalities and other industries.  We also provide some customers utilization review and/or utilization management, medical case management, and medical bill review services outside the state of California, typically to employees who have suffered a workplace injury in California and then relocated to another state.

 

Our marketing and sales efforts focus primarily on customer referrals, conference presentations, responding to requests for proposals, and advertisement. We service both local and national accounts, however, with an emphasis on California focused markets. Our sales and marketing activities are conducted by account managers with the assistance of our executive team members. We do not market our services outside the state of California.

 

During 2021, three major customers accounted for 43% of sales, approximately 24%, 11% and 8%, respectively. By comparison, during 2020 our three largest customers accounted for 42% of sales, approximately 20%, 12% and 10%, respectively.

 

Our services can be integrated to allow for partial or full bundling of services and sharing of information that create efficiencies to further reduce the costs of claims. For example, our bundled services have allowed some customers to achieve up to a 70% reduction in the cost of injury claim resolution while maintaining superior treatment for their injured workers. The cost to our customers for our bundled services is generally the same as if the services were purchased individually.

 

Competition

 

We were one of the first commercial enterprises capable of offering HCO services and MPN services in California.  Now there are many companies who compete in this market.  Many of these competitors are larger than PHCO and may have greater financial, research and marketing experience and resources than we do, and they may therefore represent substantial long-term competition.  As of December 31, 2021, in California there were seven certified health care organization licenses issued to five companies. We own two of the seven licenses, the other four licenses are divided between four other companies.  However, only three of those companies are currently writing HCO business due to the complexity of the HCO regulations. As a result, we consider our current, direct HCO competition limited to three of those licensee businesses.  There are minimal requirements for establishing MPNs and therefore, as of December 31, 2021, there were 2,468 active MPNs in the state of California according to the DWC MPN website.  Of these, we have received approval for and administer 26 MPNs.

 

We compete on both quality of service and price of services.  We maintain quality of service by virtue of the training, skill, and experience of our professional staff and outside consultants. We compete on price through our integration of robust information technology systems we license from various vendors.  We focus our business primarily on those employers and payors who use our HCO and/or MPN services.  We anticipate that this focus will keep most of this business stable and renewable.  However, periodically we expect that some large customer may establish the in-house capability of performing the services we offer, as this has occurred in the past.  Further, if we are unable to compete effectively either because of a degradation in quality-of-service delivery resulting from a reduction in the skill and experience of our personnel, or our inability to effectively manage our information technology system, it may be difficult for us to retain current customers or add new customers. With the resulting loss of customers, from whatever source, and our business, financial condition, and results of operations could be materially and adversely affected.

 

We rely on our well-trained and knowledgeable in-house professionals to develop service offerings that target the needs of our customers, all of whom seek efficient and effective resolution of workplace injuries and workers’ compensation claims. For example, we contract directly with medical providers based on quality determinations rather than the provision of discounted medical services. We believe this provides us a competitive advantage because we can market a direct relationship with providers who have demonstrated expertise in treating work related injuries and writing credible medical reports. These qualities contribute to quicker resolution of workplace injuries and workers’ compensation claims. We believe these qualities also provide more competitive value than relying on third party relationships or discounts alone.

 

We offer both HCO and MPN programs to potential customers, as well as an HCO/MPN combination model, which we believe also gives us a competitive advantage, because of the way the network was created.  While some of our competitors offer either HCO or MPN services, to our knowledge, none of our competitors offer this type of HCO/MPN combination model, nor, in our opinion, do they have the expertise to administer one.

 

9

 

Governmental Regulation

 

Managed care programs for workers’ compensation are subject to various laws and regulations.  The nature and degree of applicable regulation varies by state and by the specific services provided.  Notably, services such as our HCOs, MPNs, and utilization review services that provide or arrange for the provision of healthcare services are subject to numerous complex regulatory requirements that govern many aspects of our conduct and operations. These laws and regulations impose evolving administrative and legal burdens, expense and risk to our business, but also provide a regulated environment in which our expertise and experience help us provide valuable services for our customers based on proven strategies that work within the existing system.

 

The provision of workers’ compensation managed care in the state of California is governed by legislation and secondary regulations.  We are required to be licensed or receive regulatory approval to operate our networks and be accredited by the Utilization Review Accreditation Commission (“URAC”) in California to perform utilization review. MMC has received full Utilization Management Accreditation for Workers’ Compensation as a Utilization Review Organization (“URO”) from the Utilization Review Accreditation Commission, now known as URAC. The full accreditation demonstrates our commitment to quality and adherence to nationally recognized guidelines and must be reaccredited every three years. Our next reaccreditation is scheduled to occur by January 1, 2024. The costs to be accredited by URAC for three years is $36,000. California and other jurisdictions in which we do business require organizations who engage in claim adjusting and certain other insurance service activities to be accredited. In many jurisdictions, licensing laws and regulations generally grant broad discretion to supervisory authorities to adopt and amend regulations and to supervise regulated activities.

 

The services we provide have developed largely in response to legislation or other governmental action.  Changes in the legislation regulating workers’ compensation may create greater or lesser demand for the services we offer or require us to develop new or modified services to meet the needs of the marketplace and compete effectively, such changes could also impact our costs for providing services, perhaps to levels that make our services unattractive or unaffordable to existing or potential customers.  We could also be materially and adversely affected if the state of California were to elect to reduce the extent of medical cost containment strategies available to insurance companies and other payors or adopt other strategies for cost containment that would not support demand for our services. In order to obviate such possibilities as much as possible, we have engaged a California-based lobbyist with expertise in workers’ compensation. When there is proposed legislation in California that might affect our business, we are notified at the discussion stage and are often included as stakeholders for preliminary discussions. We are not currently aware of any such proposed legislation and do not anticipate any in the foreseeable future.

 

Healthcare reform remains a topic of considerable discussion at both the federal and state level.  Due to uncertainties regarding the ultimate features of future reform initiatives and the timing of their enactment, we cannot predict which, if any, reforms will be adopted, when they may be adopted, or what impact they may have on our business or within the industry in which we participate.  However, because workers’ compensation is primarily a disability program, not the focus of recent healthcare reform discussion, we do not believe any such healthcare reform would significantly impact workers’ compensation.

 

Employees

 

Including the employees of our subsidiaries, as of April 11, 2022, we had 32 total employees, 31 of which are full-time employees and one part-time employee.  We also use the services of several consultants.  Over the next twelve months, we anticipate hiring additional employees only if business revenues increase and our operating requirements warrant such hiring.

 

Reports to Security Holders

 

We file Annual Reports on Form 10-K, Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, Current Reports on Form 8-K, proxy and information statements and other filings pursuant to Sections 13, 14 and 15(d) of the Exchange Act, and amendments to such filings with the Commission.  The public may read and copy any materials we file with the Commission at its Public Reference Room at 100 F Street N.E., Washington, DC 20549. The public may obtain information on the operation of the Public Reference Room by calling the SEC at 1-800-SEC-0330. The Commission maintains its internet site www.sec.gov, which contains reports, proxy and information statements and our other Commission filings.  We also post an electronic copy of our annual report on our website www.pacifichealthcareorganization.com, which you can view or download free of charge.  Materials posted on our website are not part of this annual report.

 

10

 

ITEM 1A.          RISK FACTORS

 

You should carefully consider the following risk factors, together with the other information contained in this annual report and the other reports we file with the Commission, in evaluating us or making an investment in our common stock.  The risks described below are not the only ones we face.  If any of the following risks actually occurs, it could have a material adverse effect on our business, operations and financial condition. Further, additional risks that we currently do not know about or that we currently believe to be immaterial may also impair our business, operations and financial condition. You should not draw any inference as to the magnitude or likelihood of any particular risk from its position or categorization in the following discussion. Further, the headings and subheadings of the risk factors are organized based on certain shared characteristics with other risk factors, but each risk factor should be read without limiting its application or content to the heading under which it is organized.

 

Customer and Competition Related Risks

 

A significant percentage of our revenue is generated from a few customers, the loss of one or more of which could have a material impact on our results of operations, cash flows and financial condition.

 

A significant portion of operating revenue is received from a relatively small group of customers. Combined sales for three customers accounted for approximately 43% and 42% of our total revenue in 2021 and 2020, respectively.

 

We cannot guarantee that significant customers will not, at some point, terminate or reduce our services. This has happened in the past.  The loss of one or more significant customers has historically had an adverse impact on our business, results of operations, cash flows and financial condition, sometimes materially, until such time as we were able to retain new customers to replace them. While we continue to work to lessen our dependence on a few customers, we believe this will continue to be a risk into the foreseeable future.

 

Most of our customer contracts permit either party to terminate without cause.  From time to time, we have lost customers as a result of merger or acquisition transactions.  Additionally, we could lose customers due to competitive pricing pressures, failure to maintain the quality of the services we provide, our inability to retain sufficient staffing, as a result of a health crises, such as COVID-19, or natural disaster or any number of other reasons.  If several customers terminate their contracts, or do not renew or extend their contracts with us, our results could be materially adversely affected.

 

Our revenues may decline if we cannot compete successfully in an intensely competitive market.

 

We target our products to employers seeking to control the cost of employee workers’ compensation claims.  We face competition from a variety of companies and the markets for our services are fragmented and competitive.  Our competitors include national managed care providers, preferred provider networks, smaller independent providers and insurance companies. Many of our current and potential competitors have significantly greater financial, technical, marketing, and other resources than we do.  As a result, our competitors may be able to respond more quickly to new or emerging ways to manage treatment costs, including enhanced technology, changes in regulations and standards, and shifts in customer requirements.  We believe that as managed care techniques continue to gain acceptance in the marketplace our competitors will increasingly consist of insurance companies, large workers’ compensation managed care service companies and other significant providers of managed care products.  These competitors may also be able to devote greater resources to the development, promotion and sale of their services and may be able to deliver competitive services or solutions at a lower end user price.  Any of these competitive pressures could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

 

Our business is driven substantially by the relation between the value we provide and the amount we charge for that value.  If the scope and quality of our services lag behind the market or lower costs can be obtained elsewhere, we may lose customers which could have an adverse impact on our results of operations and financial condition.

 

As noted in the description of business, we are in the business of assisting our customers control the cost of their employee workers’ compensation claims.  While we believe that factors, including the quality of care provided to the employee, the rapidity at which the employee returns to work, and the service provided to the customer, play a part in attracting and retaining our customers, we believe that price is a primary determining factor in whether customers select or retain our services.  While our competitors may offer direct fees less than those we charge, they have traditionally added fees to their other associated services and thus raised the total cost of their services.  If our competitors reduce the cost at which they provide services, or our customers seek to reduce costs by performing similar services in-house, we anticipate we would have to likewise attempt to reduce the cost at which we provide our services or risk losing customers. Either outcome could have a material adverse impact on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

 

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If we are unable to continue to attract and retain key employees with the skills our business requires, our business could be impacted negatively.

 

We compete with other workers’ compensation managed care companies and healthcare providers in recruiting qualified management and staff personnel.  Employees with industry expertise are critical to our competitive strategy.  There is intense competition for the services of such persons. During the pandemic, we laid off or otherwise lost several non-key employees but were able to retain and attract the employees key to our business. However, we cannot guarantee that we will be able to attract and retain personnel in the future, particularly in a volatile labor market that disproportionately impacts us as a small service-oriented business. For example, our competitors, many of whom have greater financial resources and larger organizations than ours, offer higher salaries, better benefit packages and broader opportunities than we are able to offer.  If we are unable to effectively compete for, or otherwise attract or retain, employees, our business and financial condition could be materially adversely affected.

 

Cybersecurity and Information Technology Related Risks

 

A cybersecurity attack or other disruption to our information technology systems could result in the loss, theft, misuse, unauthorized disclosure, or unauthorized access of customer or sensitive company information or could disrupt our operations, which could damage our relationships with customers or employees, expose us to litigation or regulatory proceedings, or harm our reputation, any of which could materially adversely affect our business, financial condition or results of operations.

 

We rely heavily on third party-provided information technology to support our business activities. Our business involves the transmission and storage of confidential and personal information, including those of our customers, their employees, and our employees. We are at risk of cybersecurity breaches of the systems on which we rely, including circumvention or breach of security systems, denial-of-service attacks or other cyber-attacks, hacking, “phishing” attacks, computer viruses, ransomware, malware, employee error, malfeasance, social engineering, physical breaches or other actions. We anticipate that the threats of such incidents will continue to increase. Further, as these threats evolve, cybersecurity incidents could be more difficult to detect, defend against, and remediate. For example, we are not aware of a data security breach or material data loss in the last 10 years and have continued to operate successfully with a remote workforce during the pandemic; however, due to the difficulty of detecting certain security breaches, it is possible that our systems have been breached, but such breach remains undetected.

 

We continue to operate primarily remotely using employee laptops and accessories and secure, cloud-based data storage and access. As part of accommodating remote working, we rely on technology, software, hardware, and the internet access and home resources of individual employees. We also have less control over the hardware, physical security of equipment, and maintenance of equipment used by our off-premises employees. Although we have implemented employee IT security training and other systemic enhancements to increase security, we are still exposed to additional security and system failure risks through our accommodation of remote work.

 

In response to our adoption of remote working and the evolving nature of cybersecurity threats, generally, we have implemented additional security and access control measures, and continue to utilize a third party information technology vendor to manage the technological security and efficacy of our systems. We are also working to meet the standards for an organization of our size and type in conjunction with the National Institute of Standards and Technology. However, despite our efforts to mitigate cybersecurity risks, due to the ubiquitous and evolving nature of computer security attacks, cybersecurity breaches remain a risk to our business.

 

Any compromise or perceived compromise of our security (or the security of our third-party service providers) could damage our reputation and our relationship with our customers, third-party administrators, insurers and enrollees; reduce demand for our services; and subject us to significant liability as well as regulatory action. Cybersecurity breaches could cause us to experience reputational harm, loss of customers, loss and/or delay of revenue, loss of proprietary data, loss of licenses, regulatory actions and scrutiny, sanctions or other statutory penalties, litigation, liability for failure to safeguard customers’ information, financial losses or a drop in our stock price.

 

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Our financial performance is tied to the quality of the information technology platforms we can acquire or license from third parties to provide our services.  The information technology business evolves rapidly, and advancements can disrupt or alter our ability to remain competitive.

 

Effective and competitive delivery of our services is increasingly dependent upon the information technology resources and processes provided by third-party vendors.  In addition to better serving customers, the effective use of technology increases efficiency and enables us to reduce costs.  Our future success will depend, in part, on our ability to address the needs of our customers by using technology to provide services to enhance customer convenience, as well as to create additional efficiencies in our operations. We are largely dependent on licensing and integrating various information technology systems and software from third parties for delivery of our services, the loss, ineffective management or malfunction of which could jeopardize all or parts of our ability to deliver our services.  We anticipate that we will continue to rely on such third-party software in the future and many of the risks associated with the use of third-party software cannot be eliminated.

 

As technology in our industry changes and evolves, keeping pace may become increasingly complex and expensive, or entirely unavailable.  Disruptive technologies could result in substantially increased costs or a reduction in the services for which we currently charge our customers. For example, automation could render certain of our services uncompetitive, unprofitable, or even obsolete, and require us to alter our business plans. Further, there can be no assurance that we will be able to effectively implement new technology-driven products and services, which could reduce our ability to compete effectively, particularly because many of our competitors have greater resources to invest in technological improvements than we do. The ability to provide our services may also suffer from the impacts of industry consolidation, as larger companies privatize, acquire, develop, retire, or limit the licensing of, the software we currently rely on for providing our services. The cost of technologies we rely on may also change drastically, changing the profitability profiles of certain services and, in extreme cases, the viability of that line of business for us. Because we rely heavily on various technologies and their ability to integrate together to provide our services, the occurrence of any of these events could have a material adverse impact on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

 

An interruption in our ability to access, review or deliver critical data may cause customers to terminate our services and/or may reduce our ability to effectively compete.

 

Certain aspects of our business are dependent upon our ability to store, retrieve, process and manage data and to maintain and upgrade our data processing capabilities.  Interruption of data processing capabilities for any extended length of time, loss of stored data, programming errors or other system failures could cause our customers to terminate our services and could have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations.

 

In addition, we expect that a considerable amount of our future growth will depend on our ability to process and manage claims data more efficiently and to provide more meaningful healthcare information to customers and payors of healthcare.  There can be no assurance that our current data processing capabilities will be adequate, that we will be able to efficiently upgrade our systems to meet future needs, or that we will be able to develop, license or otherwise acquire software to address market demands as well or as timely as our competitors.

 

If we are unable to safeguard the security and privacy of confidential data, including personal information of our customers and their employees, our reputation and business could be harmed. 

 

We are subject to data privacy related risks. Our services involve the collection and storage of confidential and personal information and the transmission of this information, most often electronically.  For example, we collect personal information of our employees and our customers’ employees. We cannot guarantee such information is invulnerable to security breaches.  In certain cases, such information is also provided to third parties, the transmission of which is also subject to security risks. Once such information is in the control of the third parties whom we transmit it to, we are most often no longer able to control the use of such information, or the security protections employed by such third parties.  We may be required to expend significant capital and other resources to protect against these types of security breaches or to alleviate problems caused by security breaches.  

 

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In addition, as new data privacy and security laws are implemented, we may be unable to timely comply with such requirements, or such requirements may not be compatible with our current processes. Changing our processes to address new data security laws or customer requirements could be time consuming and expensive and the failure to timely implement required changes could result in our inability to sell our services or retain customers. For example, the California Consumer Privacy Act (“CCPA”) which is currently effective, and the California Privacy Rights Act (“CPRA”) which is scheduled to take effect on January 1, 2023, can require certain businesses to give California consumers more control over their data and share certain notices regarding their privacy practices. We believe we are currently exempt from compliance with the CCPA, but if we have misinterpreted the existing exemptions, or if amendments to or official guidance related to these laws changes the availability of these exemptions to us, we may incur significant costs, administrative burdens, and legal liabilities as a result. As currently written, we do not anticipate being exempt from the CPRA when it takes effect. As such, we anticipate needing to comply with the CPRA when it becomes effective and incurring the additional administrative and other costs and burdens involved.

 

Our collection and transmission of confidential and personal information subjects us to numerous related security breach risks and regulatory compliance risks. Our failure to comply with evolving regulatory requirements related to the collection and transmission of such information or the loss, unauthorized disclosure or access of such information could lead to significant reputational or competitive harm, result in litigation or regulatory proceedings, or cause us to incur substantial liabilities, fines, penalties or expenses.

 

Licensure and Regulatory Risks

 

Failure to maintain our licenses and/or accreditation would have material impact on our business.

 

We require state issued licenses to operate our HCOs and approvals of our MPNs in the state of California.  If the state of California were to determine that we have failed to comply with the licensure or approval requirements, it has the authority to deny, suspend or revoke our licenses or approvals.  Further, our HCO licenses and MPN approvals must be recertified every three years and reapproved every four years, respectively. If our licenses or approvals were suspended, revoked, or not recertified or reapproved we would no longer be able to operate our HCO and/or MPN networks.  In addition to the reduction in revenue we would experience from the loss of our HCO and/or MPN operations, the other services we offer would likely also be impacted negatively as many of the customers for our utilization review, medical bill review and medical case management services are derived from our HCO and MPN customers. Similarly, the state of California requires workers compensation organizations performing utilization review in California to be accredited by URAC. We must be reaccredited by URAC every three years. If we were to lose our URAC accreditation or not receive reaccreditation, we would experience a reduction in utilization review revenue in California and other states. Other states in which we currently perform utilization review or utilization management each have different standards for authorizing utilization review organizations. If we were to fail to meet those varied standards or experience administrative difficulty managing the maintenance of these various certifications and approvals, we could experience a reduction in utilization review revenue and/or fines or penalties.

 

Our cost of operation and/or demand for our services may be negatively impacted by changes in government regulations.

 

Our primary business operations are subject to licensing and other regulatory requirements in California, including minimum qualification standards for personnel, confidentiality, internal quality control and dispute resolution procedures.  The cost of compliance with these regulatory programs can increase our costs of operation, which may make it difficult for us to compete with other available alternatives for workers’ compensation healthcare cost control. The healthcare and workers’ compensation regulatory environment is constantly evolving.  While we try to be involved in the legislative process and to stay informed on industry developments, we cannot predict what additional government initiatives affecting our business, if any, may be promulgated in the future.  We cannot assure that we will always be able to adapt to new or modified regulatory requirements or to keep in force necessary licenses and government approvals.  Proposals for healthcare legislative reforms are regularly considered at the federal and state levels.  To the extent that such proposals affect workers’ compensation, such proposals may render us unable to deliver services profitably, reduce demand for our services, or require us to develop new or modified services.  Any of these factors could materially impact our results of operations.

 

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Industry Trend Related Risks

 

Efforts to minimize the use of certain healthcare cost containment techniques may cause our revenue to decrease.

 

Within the industry there has been a movement among certain healthcare providers to resist the use of cost containment techniques. Some have even resorted to litigation to challenge the application of particular cost containment measures. This includes challenges to insurers’ claims adjudication and reimbursement decisions. While these lawsuits have not yet involved us or any services we currently offer directly, the impact of such efforts and cases may negatively affect our cost containment services revenue.

 

Increased use of early intervention services could negatively impact our revenue.

 

Our revenue could be negatively impacted by the increased use of early intervention services such as injury occupational healthcare, first notice of loss, and telephonic case management services. The implementation at an early stage in the workers’ compensation claim by healthcare payors of these early intervention services can lead to decreases in the average length of, and the total costs associated with, a healthcare claim, which may reduce or even eliminate the need for the later stage network and healthcare management services we provide.

 

Declines in workers compensation claims could materially impact our financial condition and results of operations.

 

Within the past few years, as the labor market has become less labor intensive and more services oriented, there have been fewer work-related injuries. Employers are being more proactive in educating their employees to prevent work-related injuries and illnesses. While the types of injuries may shift, there are many employers who still need our services. In California, employers are responsible for work-related injuries even if they occur while performing work-related activities at home. Changes in the strength of the economy also affect the size and activity of the work force and consequently the level of workers’ compensation claims. 

 

In 2020 and through the beginning of 2022, the State of California and local governments required many businesses to close, limit their operations, provide the option for remote work or utilize technology to replace employees. These business closures and reductions in our customers’ workforces decreased the number of our customers’ employees and by extension, the number of employees potentially exposed to workplace injuries. Our HCO and MPN services generate revenue based on employee counts, so the drop in employee counts has negatively impacted us during COVID-19. As of the end of 2021 we have seen some customers increasing their workforce as the COVID-19 restrictions in California have lifted. Should COVID-19 restrictions return and there is a decrease in our customers’ workforce, our business financial condition and results of operations could be affected negatively.

 

Risks Related to Owning our Securities

 

The price and trading volume of our common stock may be volatile, which may negatively affect the value and liquidity of your shares.

 

The market price of our common stock may be volatile and subject to fluctuations.  During the twelve-month period ended December 31, 2021, the low bid price for our common stock was $0.84 per share and the high bid price was $1.19 per share, (on an as adjusted basis to reflect the four-shares-for-one-share forward stock split that became effective on January 6, 2020).  Our common stock is currently quoted on the OTCQB, which is generally a thinly traded market that lacks the liquidity of certain other public markets.  Additionally, there are a limited number of our shares of common stock outstanding, which may further limit the liquidity of our shares.  Moreover, in the past, stock markets have experienced price and volume fluctuations that have particularly affected companies in the healthcare and managed care markets resulting in changes in the market price of the stock of many companies, which may not have been directly related to the operating performance of those companies.  We cannot assure you that the market price for our common stock will not fluctuate or decline significantly in the future or that there will be sufficient trading volume in our common stock to allow you to sell your shares in the market when you desire to do so.

 

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Our Chief Executive Officer, President and Chairman of the board of directors has the ability to exercise significant control over the Company.

 

Tom Kubota, our Chief Executive Officer, President and Chairman of the board of directors beneficially owns 8,025,000 shares, or approximately 62.7% of our outstanding common stock.  Since 2008, Mr. Kubota has held a majority of our outstanding common stock and voting control of the Company.  Mr. Kubota also holds 16,000 shares of our Series A preferred stock, which represents 100% of the outstanding shares of Series A preferred stock.  In most matters, our Series A preferred stock is treated on parity with our common stock on a share-for-share basis, with the exception that each share of Series A preferred stock is entitled to 20,000 votes of common stock on all matters submitted to a vote of our common stockholders.  The Series A preferred stock is convertible to shares of our common stock on a one share for one share basis at the election of the holder thereof.  This capital structure may be viewed positively, negatively or indifferently by the market, investors and potential acquisition targets.  If it is viewed negatively it could affect the liquidity and/or market price for our common stock, our ability to participate in merger and acquisition or capital raising transactions.

 

COVID-19 Related Risks

 

The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and the responses to its spread have adversely affected and will likely continue to adversely impact our customers, our workforce, our business, operations, results of operations and financial condition.

 

The global spread of the COVID-19 pandemic has created significant volatility, uncertainty and economic disruption. The extent to which the COVID-19 pandemic impacts our business, operations and financial results continues to depend on numerous evolving factors that we may not be able to accurately predict or control, including: the duration and scope of the pandemic; governmental, business and individuals’ actions that have been and continue to be taken in response to the pandemic; the impact of the pandemic and actions taken in response on economic activity; the effect on our ability to provide services to our customers; the volume of workers’ compensation claims, including decreases in volume resulting from our customers’ reductions of employees or employees being exposed to fewer work-related injuries while remotely working; the demand for our specialty services and the ability of our customers to budget for them; the response of workers’ compensation insurers to the cumulative economic effects of the pandemic; and the scope and timeline of the economic response to the end of the pandemic’s most serious effects on the business activity of our customers.

 

It remains to be seen what the overall or lasting effects of the pandemic will be on the workers’ compensation industry. While the pandemic may represent an anomaly in insurance trends, it may also be the catalyst for other changes that could affect the industry, including but not limited to: major changes to labor and workers’ compensation laws and regulations; changes to the availability of provider services; an increase or reduction in overall workers’ compensation claims and associated expenses that may impact demand for our services; an increase or decrease in demand for labor; and other socioeconomic trends that may affect the workers’ compensation industry.

 

Our revenue is largely dependent upon the number of injured workers we treat and help return to work. In response to measures implemented by the United States federal and California State governments to stem the spread of COVID-19, many of our customers have had to reduce their workforces, which has led to a decrease among our customers in the number of employees they have working and enrolled in our programs. This has also led to reductions in workplace injuries and the number of employee injuries we treat. During much of 2020, medical providers were required to limit non-essential medical procedures for existing workplace injuries. This caused a reduction of medical care to oversee and resulted in a decrease in revenue for our medical management services. Through 2020 and intermittently in 2021 and 2022, California state and local governments continued to place limitations on business operations, with variations depending on industry, locality, and the severity of the pandemic. As of the date of this report, California has lifted the COVID-19 restrictions, but we cannot predict if they will be implemented again if future outbreaks occur.

 

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In response to stay-at-home orders and other measures employed by the state of California, in mid-March 2020, we activated the remote work functionality of our business continuity plan for all essential employees and nearly all other employees. Since that time, nearly all critical business functions have been rendered remotely. Through the first quarter of 2022, we have continued to keep our workforce almost entirely remote and have implemented strict risk reduction measures in the on-site office work environment, including limiting on-site capacity to 10%; requiring pre-shift symptom checks, the use of face coverings, social distancing and virtual meetings; enhancing cleaning and sanitizing measures; and other practices and physical changes that tend to reduce the risk of contracting COVID-19 at work. We are continually assessing the situation and taking such actions as we believe appropriate to respond to threats and potential business impacts, including incurring expenses to maintain remote work viability, information technology and security. Thus far these measures have shown to be effective in preventing the spread of COVID-19 among our employees in the course of their employment, and we have incurred no workers’ compensation costs or penalties from Cal/OSHA or other relevant safety authorities, or lost labor hours due to an outbreak. Although the success of our COVID-19 risk mitigation measures to date gives us reason to expect continued success in mitigating the risk of COVID-19 to our internal operations and business continuity, there is no certainty that the measures will continue to work or will work as effectively in the future as they have in the past.

 

In the first quarter of 2022, we took steps to reduce the footprint of our physical office locations with the intention to keep our workforce primarily remote. As we continue to rely on off-premises technology, such as cloud-based services and the computers and internet access of individual employees, we are exposed to cybersecurity risks and risks related to the efficacy and reliability of such systems not in our control. As further discussed above at “Cybersecurity and Information Technology Related Risks we have implemented security measures to mitigate some of these risks, but our continued reliance on these technologies exposes us to risks of systems failures, business interruptions, data loss and other events which could have a material adverse impact on our business and the business of our customers.

 

The availability, distribution and effectiveness of COVID-19 vaccinations are other factors that will continue to affect our internal operations and the revenue-generating activities of our customers in 2022 and beyond. Continued availability and effectiveness of vaccinations may contribute to economic acceleration of our customers and prospective customers, and conversely, ineffective vaccination results over time may reduce the economic prospects of our customers and decrease their use of our services.

 

Despite global efforts to adapt to and mitigate the spread of COVID-19, the local and global outbreak of COVID-19 continues to evolve. The future impacts of COVID-19 on our business, result of operations, financial condition and liquidity, and the local, national and global economy continues to be uncertain, though we have seen signs that many aspects of life are returning to pre-pandemic practices. Because of the continuous evolution and many variables at play, it is difficult for us to predict the degree of impact COVID-19 will continue to have on our business.

 

General Risk Factors

 

If we are successful in making strategic acquisitions, there exists a risk that an acquisition could have a negative impact on our business.

 

From time to time, management evaluates potential opportunities to expand our business through strategic acquisitions. To date, we have been unsuccessful in our efforts to identify suitable acquisition candidates. Even if we are successful in identifying and making strategic acquisitions, there can be no assurance such acquisitions will positively impact our business and results of operations. Acquisitions are subject to numerous risks. Expenses arising from our efforts could have a negative impact on operating results, at least in the short term. If such transactions do occur, there can be no assurance that we will be able to effectively integrate the acquired businesses. In addition, any such transactions would be subject to various risks associated with the acquisition of businesses, including, but not limited to, the following:

 

•         an acquisition may (i) negatively impact our results of operations because it may require incurring large one-time charges, substantial debt or liabilities; (ii) require the amortization or write down of amounts related to deferred compensation, goodwill and other intangible assets; or (iii) cause adverse tax consequences, substantial depreciation, or deferred compensation charges;

•         we may encounter difficulties in assimilating and integrating the businesses, technologies, products, services, personnel, or operations of companies that are acquired, particularly if key personnel of acquired companies decide not to work for us;

 

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•         an acquisition may disrupt ongoing business, divert resources, increase expenses, and distract management;

•         the acquired businesses, products, services, or technologies may not generate sufficient revenue to offset acquisition costs;

•         we may have to issue equity or debt securities to complete an acquisition, which would dilute the position of stockholders and could adversely affect the market price of our common stock; and

•         the acquisitions may involve the entry into a geographic or business market in which we have little or no prior experience.

 

There can be no assurance that we will be able to identify or consummate any future acquisitions on favorable terms, or at all, or that any future acquisitions will not have an adverse impact on our business or results of operations. If suitable opportunities arise, we may finance such transactions through debt or equity financing. There can be no assurance, however, that such debt or equity financing would be available to us on acceptable terms or at all when, and if, suitable strategic opportunities arise.

 

Litigation and legal liability may adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.

 

In instances where we make recommendations concerning the appropriateness of providers’ medical treatment plans for patients, we could potentially be exposed to legal claims from adverse medical outcomes. We do not believe we engage in the practice of medicine or medical services. Similarly, we do not grant or deny claims for payment of benefits.  Notwithstanding this, there is nothing that bars someone from making a claim that the services we provide constitute the practice of medicine or the delivery of medical services.

 

In addition, we cannot assure that we will not be the subject to litigation, including but not limited to, being joined in litigation brought against one of our customers in the managed care industry.  While we maintain professional liability insurance and such other coverages as we believe are reasonable considering our experience to date, this coverage may be insufficient.  We also cannot assure you that insurance companies will always make insurance available to us at a reasonable cost to protect us from significant future liability. If we become subject to litigation our business, financial condition or results of operations could be negatively impacted.

 

Competition to hire or retain qualified employees and increasing costs of employee benefits may result in increased labor cost and decreased profitability.

 

It can be difficult for us to hire and retain qualified and capable individuals to fill roles for our day-to-day operational staff and for more senior or specialized employees. Moreover, the cost associated with employee benefits can experience significant increases based on economic factors beyond our control. We compete in the employee market with many larger, more established companies, many of which have greater resources and offer more robust benefits. Our failure to hire and retain employees within our current pay structure and increases in employee benefits costs could result in increased operating expenses and decreased profitability. Since the economic instability caused by the pandemic, we have had some opportunity to take advantage of a labor market more favorable to employers by hiring highly qualified employees at rates within our budget and in locations with lower costs of living; however, recent macroeconomic inflationary trends may make bring back challenges in hiring and retaining the necessary employees.

 

The effects of inflation may have a disproportionate impact on our business.

 

The majority of our assets and liabilities are monetary in nature, as opposed to businesses that have significant investments in fixed assets or inventories. Because of this, the effects of rising inflation may impact us more than many other businesses, including the value of holding on to our cash position over time and related ability to capitalize on potential acquisition opportunities. Further, inflation may affect our customers similarly and their ability to maintain and grow employee head counts. Inflation may also affect the general level of interest rates, which, among other things, will likely increase borrowing costs and preclude further growth of our business and the business of our customers.

 

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Acts of war, terrorist attacks, natural disasters (including those related to COVID-19, as discussed above), may harm our business, operating results and financial condition.

 

As acts of war, terrorist attacks, natural disasters, or other similar events may disrupt our operations, as well as the operations of our customers. For example, in February 2022, Russia launched a large-scale invasion of Ukraine. The extent and duration of Russian military action in Ukraine, resulting sanctions and countermeasures and future market disruptions, are impossible to predict, but could be significant. Such acts have created and continue to create economic and political uncertainty and have contributed to recent global economic instability. Resulting disruptions to the U.S. economy in general and the businesses of our customers could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

ITEM 1B.         UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

 

None.

 

ITEM 2.           PROPERTIES

 

We currently lease approximately 9,439 square feet of office space located at 1201 Dove Street, Suite 300 in Newport Beach, CA 92660. Our lease ends April 30, 2022. We have entered a new 12-month lease, commencing April 1, 2022, and are in the process of relocating our office to 19800 MacArthur Boulevard, Suite 306 and 307, Irvine, California 92612.  This new office space lease is approximately 320 square feet and will expire in March 2023.  This space will serve as our principal executive offices as well as, the principal offices of each of our subsidiaries. The new office space will be primarily for the executive team and includes shared office space for key employees to use as needed. We have decided to keep the majority of our workers remote, which gives us the flexibility to hire employees inside and outside of the state of California. We anticipate our new facilities will be suitable and adequate for our needs for the next twelve months. Our telephone number is 949-721-8272.

 

ITEM 3.         LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

 

For information regarding legal proceedings, see Note 9 - Commitments and Contingencies in the notes to our audited consolidated financial statements included in this report, which discussion we incorporate by reference into this Item.

 

ITEM 4.         MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

 

Not applicable.

 

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PART II

 

ITEM 5.         MARKET FOR REGISTRANTS COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

 

Market Information

 

Our common stock is currently traded on the OTCQB under the ticker symbol “PFHO”.  The following table presents the published quarterly high and low bid quotations for the periods indicated and was furnished to us by OTC Markets Group, Inc.  These quotations reflect inter-dealer prices without retail mark-up, mark-down or commission and may not necessarily represent actual transactions.

 

   

High

   

Low

 

Fiscal year ended December 31, 2021*

               

Fourth Quarter

  $ 1.05     $ 0.84  

Third Quarter

  $ 1.09     $ 0.85  

Second Quarter

  $ 1.17     $ 1.05  

First Quarter

  $ 1.19     $ 0.96  
                 

Fiscal year ended December 31, 2020*

               

Fourth Quarter

  $ 1.02     $ 0.82  

Third Quarter

  $ 1.02     $ 0.82  

Second Quarter

  $ 1.10     $ 0.90  

First Quarter

  $ 1.25     $ 1.21  

 

* All amounts adjusted to reflect the four-shares-for-one-share forward split of the Company’s stock that took effect on January 6, 2020.

 

Holders

 

As of April 11, 2022, we had 287 shareholders of record holding 12,800,000 shares of our common stock.  The number of record shareholders was determined from the records of our stock transfer agent and does not include beneficial owners of common stock whose shares are held in “nominee” or “street” name by banks, brokers and other financial institutions.

 

Dividends

 

Our ability to pay dividends is subject to limitations imposed by Utah law.  Under Utah law, dividends may not be paid if, after giving effect to the dividend; a) the company would be unable to pay its debts as they become due in the usual course of business; or b) the company’s total assets would be less than the sum of its total liabilities plus the amount that would be needed to satisfy the rights of any holders of preferential rights whose rights are superior to those receiving the dividend.

 

We did not declare dividends on our outstanding common stock during the years ended December 31, 2021 or 2020, and we do not currently anticipate declaring cash dividends in the foreseeable future.

 

Securities Authorized for Issuance Under Equity Compensation Plans

 

Information regarding securities authorized for issuance under our equity compensation plans is set forth under the heading “Equity Compensation Plans in Item 12 Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters of this annual report.

 

Performance Graph

 

Smaller reporting companies are not required to provide the information required by this Item.

 

20

 

Recent Sales of Unregistered Securities

 

Except as previously reported in our Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q and our Current Reports on Form 8-K, we have not sold any equity securities during the quarter ended December 31, 2021, which were not registered under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended.

 

Purchases of Equity Securities by the Issuer and Affiliated Purchasers

 

We did not repurchase any of our equity securities during the year ended December 31, 2021.

 

ITEM 6.         RESERVED

 

 

ITEM 7.         MANAGEMENTS DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

 

The following is a discussion of our financial condition and results of operations for the years ended December 31, 2021 and 2020, and other factors that are expected to affect our prospective financial condition. The following discussion and analysis should be read together with our audited consolidated financial statements and related notes included in Item 8 Financial Statements and Supplementary Data of this annual report.

 

Some of the statements set forth in this section are forward-looking statements relating to our future results of operations, financial condition, liquidity and capital resources.  Our actual results, financial condition, liquidity and capital resources may vary from the results anticipated by these statements.  We disclaim any obligation to update or revise any forward-looking statements based on the occurrence of future events, the receipt of new information, or otherwise.  Actual future results may differ materially from those expressed in the forward-looking statements as a result of risks, uncertainties and assumptions.  Please see “Cautionary Statement Regarding Forward-Looking Statements” and Item 1A Risk Factors of this annual report.

 

Overview

 

We are workers’ compensation cost containment specialists.  Our business objective is to deliver value to our customers that reduces their workers’ compensation related medical claims expense in a manner that will assure injured employees receive high quality healthcare that allows them to recover from injury and return to gainful employment without undue delay.  Our customers include self-administered employers, insurers, third party administrators, municipalities and others.  While we process medical bill reviews in several states, our customers are based principally in California where the high cost of workers’ compensation insurance is a critical problem.

 

Our core services focus on reducing medical treatment costs by enabling our customers to share control over the medical treatment process of their injured workers.  This control is obtained by participation in one of our medical treatment networks.  We realize revenues from enrollment of the employees of our customers into our various networks. We also provide claims-related services including utilization review, medical case management, medical bill review, lien representation, workers’ compensation carve-outs, legal support and Medicare set-aside services that bring efficiencies to claims processing and management that reduce the overall burden of workers’ compensation claims resolution.

 

Our business generally has a long sales cycle, typically eight months or more.  Once we have established a customer relationship and enrolled employees of our customers, our revenue adjusts with the growth or retraction of our customers’ managed headcount.  Throughout the year, new employees and customers are added while others terminate for a variety of reasons.

 

As discussed in this annual report, COVID-19 has had and will likely continue to have an impact on our business. Even after work restrictions and social distancing mandates were lifted some of our customers have not fully returned to pre-pandemic work force levels or have transitioned some of their workforce to be remote. We have noticed that while customers have a reduced workforce, there was an increase in COVID-19 related claims during the fourth quarter of 2021 through the beginning of 2022. We anticipate that we will continue to see seasonal fluctuations in COVID-19 related claims, but fewer severe claims. The reduction in our customers’ workforce and remote working, could lead to lower incidences of workplace injuries. Notwithstanding such reductions, this does not eliminate an employer’s obligation to provide workers compensation coverage to employees working remotely.

 

21

 

We expect businesses will continue to seek ways to control their workers’ compensation program costs.  While our HCO and MPN programs have been shown to create a favorable return on investment for our customers, (as our services are a significant component of our customers’ loss prevention programs), from time to time we experience customer volatility in the form of existing customers terminating or seeking to renegotiate the scope and terms of existing services, switching to a third party administrator or insurance company that provides the same services as ours, or seeking to reduce costs by managing their workers’ compensation care services in-house.

 

Impact of COVID-19 on our Business

 

We have been able to adapt our business operations to a primarily remote workforce, with no material interruptions in service, data breaches, technology failures, or inability to complete mission-critical functions. We have been able to effectively maintain contact with employees, partners, customers, and other related parties using technological solutions such as virtual meetings and enhanced collaboration programs and have developed policies and protocols to ensure department and employee performance quality is maintained despite the change in work setting. This has resulted in a shift from in-person office related costs to costs associated with maintaining a remote workforce, including reimbursing employees for internet, phone, and office supply expenses; additional computer hardware costs; and some administrative burdens in complying with California laws and regulations related to COVID-19. With fewer employees coming to the office, we have fewer costs related to sanitizing, cleaning, and providing PPE supplies to the office to prevent potential COVID-19 exposure.

 

Revenue for our services is derived from our customers’ employee headcount and workers’ workplace injuries. During the periods covered by this report, several of our customers, including some of our largest customers, had to suspend or significantly modify their operations during much or all of the pandemic. Since California lifted its COVID-19 restrictions, some of our customers continue to experience lower than normal business volume and employee counts due to the pandemic. Until the impacts of COVID-19 on our customers’ businesses lessen, employees return to more normal workloads and the occurrence of workplace injuries returns to more traditional levels, we anticipate our revenues will continue to be negatively affected.

 

California has passed legislation to address employer liability in Workers’ Compensation for COVID-19 cases. The law creates two rebuttable presumptions that COVID-19 illnesses contracted by specific categories of employees are work related and therefore eligible for workers’ compensation. The first presumption applies to COVID-19 workers’ compensation claims filed by peace officers, firefighters, first responders, and health care workers, and does not apply to our employees, though it may apply to our customers’ claims. The second presumption, for employers with five or more employees, applies to employees who test positive for COVID-19 during an outbreak at the employee’s specific place of employment. An outbreak occurs when a set number of employees – depending on the number of employees at the workplace – test positive for COVID-19 during a continuous 14-day period. This presumption applies to the Company. However, no Workers’ Compensation cases related to COVID-19 and/or via this California law have been filed against the Company to date.

 

In April 2020, the Department of Labor issued regulations to implement the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (“FFCRA”) which provided employees paid leave for COVID-19 related illness for themselves and/or a family member and provided employers with tax credits. The FFRCA expired on December 31, 2020. In March 2021, the American Rescue Plan Act (“ARPA”) was signed into law. The ARPA made tax credits available to employers with fewer than 500 employees who voluntarily chose to grant employees paid leave under the FFCRA through September 30, 2021 and updated certain FFCRA leave provisions. We voluntarily chose to extend the FFCRA paid leave to our employees through its expiration on September 30, 2021 and take the tax credits. Since its expiration, we have ceased to offer COVID-19-specific paid leave benefits to our employees. Family, medical, and other types of leave remain available to employees under existing company policy.

 

In March 2021, California passed its own COVID-19 Supplemental Paid Sick Leave law (“CA SPSL”). It provided employees paid leave for COVID-19 related reasons such as caring for themselves, family members, or for vaccine related appointments or illnesses caused by COVID-19 or the vaccine from January 1, 2021 through September 30, 2021. The CA SPSL allowed employees to retroactively request reimbursement for qualifying leave or to use it towards future requests through September 30, 2021. Employers whose employees utilized CA SPSL are eligible for federal tax credits to offset the costs of providing the CA SPSL. On September 30, 2021, the CA SPSL paid leave expired.

 

22

 

In June 2021, the Governor of California terminated the executive order that put into place the Stay Home Order and Blueprint for a Safer Economy. This removed restrictions on physical distancing, capacity limits on businesses, and the county tiers system. We have elected to allow employees to continue working remotely and made arrangements to reduce our office space to an executive and shared office for other employees to come in periodically in 2022.

 

In February 2022, California passed another COVID-19 Supplemental Paid Sick Leave law (“CSPSL”). It provides employees paid leave for COVID-19 related reasons such as caring for themselves, family members, or for vaccine related appointments or illnesses caused by COVID-19 or the vaccine from January 1, 2022 through September 30, 2022. The CSPSL allows employees to retroactively request reimbursement for qualifying leave or to use it towards future requests through September 30, 2022. Unlike the CA SPSL from 2021, employers whose employees utilize CSPSL are ineligible for federal tax credits to offset the costs of providing the CSPSL.

 

We will continue to offer COVID-19-specific paid leave benefits to our employees until the expiration of CSPSL. Family, medical, and other types of leave remain available to employees under existing Company policy. As of April 2022, we have incurred negligible payroll, benefits, administrative, and liability costs related to CSPSL. However, we could incur some significant costs if a second booster shot is recommended or required later in 2022, or if another spike in COVID-19 results in increased usage of the CSPSL benefit by employees.

 

Unlike much of the U.S. economy, we have maintained relatively steady employee recruitment and retention. Our maintenance of a successful remote environment, including high employee morale and cohesive culture via technology, has also allowed us to seek candidates in a wider range of locations, some of which have lower costs of living and lower wage norms, as well as increasing the quantity of qualified applicants. While we cannot predict or control future trends in labor in our industry, we believe that our solid recruitment practices and the opportunities presented by remote work options will help us adapt to a changing workforce environment.

 

In response to COVID-19 and transitioning to a remote workforce, we have taken measures to ensure data security, but there is no guarantee that these measures will be completely effective, that our productivity will not be adversely impacted, or that we will not encounter some of the common risks associated with a remote workforce, including employees accessing company data and systems remotely. As discussed in greater detail in Item 1A Risk Factors of this annual report, our business has been and could continue to be materially and adversely affected by the potential interruptions to our business operations resulting from changes to our business model in response to COVID-19.

 

Summary of Fiscal 2021

 

During the year ended December 31, 2021, total revenues decreased 11%. Revenue from HCO remained flat while MPN and medical bill review revenue increased by 4% and 21%, respectively. Revenue from utilization review, medical case management, and other fees decreased 4%, 26%, 16%, respectively. 

 

During fiscal 2021, operating expenses decreased by 6%, primarily as a result of decreases in depreciation, bad debt provision, consulting fees, salaries and wages, insurance, outsource service fees, and general and administration expenses. These decreases were partially offset by an increase in data maintenance, while professional fees remained flat. As a result, our income from operations was $516,475 compared to $820,271 during fiscal 2020.

 

Our provision for income tax expense decreased 26% during fiscal 2021, from $270,701 in 2020 to $201,055 in 2021 due to a reduction in income from operations.

 

Our net income also increased 81% from $549,570 in 2020 to $995,020 in 2021 primarily as a result of the Paycheck Protection Program loan forgiveness income.  Basic and fully diluted earnings per share during fiscal 2021 was $0.08 and $0.08, respectively compared to $0.04 and $0.04, respectively during fiscal 2020.

 

Revenue

 

We derive revenue primarily from fees charged for access to our provider networks, and for review and medical case management services.

 

23

 

HCO

 

HCO revenue is generated largely from fees charged to our employer customers for claim network fees to access to our HCO networks, employee enrollment into our HCO program, program administration, custom network fees, annual and new hire notifications and fees for other ancillary services they may select.

 

MPN

 

Like HCO revenue, MPN revenue is generated largely from fees charged to our employer customers for claim network fees to access our MPN networks, custom network fees, employee enrollment into our MPN program, program administration, and fees for other services our MPN customers may select. Unlike the HCO, MPNs do not require annual and new hire notifications, MPNs are only required to provide a notice to an injured worker at the time the employer is notified by the injured worker that an injury occurred.

 

Utilization review

 

Utilization review is the review of medical treatment requests by providers to provide a safeguard for employers and injured workers against unnecessary and inappropriate medical treatment from the perspective of medical necessity, quality of care, appropriateness of decision-making, and timeliness of treatment. Its purpose is to reduce employer liability for medical costs that are not medically appropriate or approved by the relevant medical and legal authorities and the payor.

 

Medical bill review

 

California and many other states have established fee schedules for the maximum allowable fees payable under workers’ compensation for a variety of procedures performed by medical providers. Many procedures, however, are not covered under the fee schedules, such as hospital bills, which still require review and negotiation. Medical bill review involves analyzing medical provider services and equipment billing to ascertain proper reimbursement. Such services include, but are not limited to, coding review and re-bundling, confirming that the services are customary and reasonable, fee schedule compliance, out-of-network bill review, pharmacy review, and preferred provider organization repricing arrangements. Our medical bill review services can result in significant savings for our customers.

 

The following table sets forth, for the years ended December 31, 2021 and 2020, the percentage each revenue item identified in our audited consolidated financial statements contributed to total revenue during the respective period.

 

   

2021

   

2020

 

HCO

    27 %     24 %

MPN

    10 %     8 %

Utilization review

    20 %     19 %

Medical bill review

    7 %     5 %

Medical case management

    33 %     40 %

Other

    3 %     4 %

 

Expense

 

Consulting fees

 

Consulting fees include fees we pay to third parties for IT, marketing, and in-house legal advice for the various services we offer.

 

Salaries and wages

 

Salaries and wages reflect employment-related compensation we pay to our employee, payroll processing, payroll taxes and commission.

 

24

 

Professional fees

 

Professional fees include fees we pay to third parties to provide medical consulting, medical case management, and board of director’s fees for board meetings, as well as, legal and accounting fees.

 

Insurance

 

Insurance expense is comprised primarily of health insurance benefits offered to our employees, directors’ and officers’ liability insurance, Workers’ Compensation coverage and business liability coverage.

 

Data maintenance fees

 

Data maintenance fees includes fees we pay to a third party to process HCO and MPN employee enrollment. These fees fluctuate throughout the year because of the varied timing of customer enrollment into the HCO or MPN program and the number of employees they have in their workforce.

 

Outsource service fees

 

Outsource service fees consist of costs incurred by our subsidiaries in partially outsourcing utilization review, medical bill review, administrative services for medical case management and Medicare set-aside services and typically tends to increase and decrease in correlation with the demand for those services. 

 

General and administrative

 

General and administrative expenses consist primarily of office rent, advertising, dues and subscriptions, equipment/repairs, IT enhancement, licenses and permits, telephone, office supplies, parking, postage, printing and reproduction, rent expense for equipment, miscellaneous expenses, shareholders’ expense, charity – cash contribution, auto expenses, bank charges, education, travel and entertainment, and vacation expense.

 

The following table sets forth, for the years ended December 31, 2021 and 2020, the percentage each expense item identified in our audited consolidated financial statements contributed to total expense during the respective period.

 

   

2021

   

2020

 

Depreciation

    1 %     1 %

Bad debt provision

    0 %     0 %

Consulting fees

    5 %     5 %

Salaries and wages

    56 %     56 %

Professional fees

    6 %     6 %

Insurance

    7 %     7 %

Outsource service fees

    7 %     9 %

Data maintenance

    4 %     3 %

General and administrative

    14 %     13 %

 

25

 

Results of Operations

 

Comparison of the fiscal years ended December 31, 2021 and 2020

 

The following represents selected components of our consolidated results of operations, for the years ended December 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively, together with changes from year-to-year:

 

   

Year Ended December 31

                 
   

2021

   

2020

   

Amount of Change

   

% of Change

 

Revenues

                               

HCO

  $ 1,449,345     $ 1,453,365     $ (4,020

)

    -

%

MPN

    524,148       502,590       21,558       4

%

Utilization review

    1,091,792       1,142,796       (51,004

)

    (4

%)

Medical bill review

    368,721       305,510       63,211       21

%

Medical case management

    1,771,718       2,404,148       (632,430

)

    (26

%)

Other

    197,386       234,309       (36,923

)

    (16

%)

Total revenues

    5,403,110       6,042,718       (639,608

)

    (11

%)

                                 

Expense

                               

Depreciation

    48,887       55,428       (6,541

)

    (12

%)

Bad debt provision

    15,656       20,101       (4,445

)

    (22

%)

Consulting fees

    237,582       253,181       (15,599

)

    (6

%)

Salaries and wages

    2,740,806       2,916,576       (175,770

)

    (6

%)

Professional fees

    293,936       295,358       (1,422

)

    -

%

Insurance

    321,690       351,122       (29,432

)

    (8

%)

Outsource service fees

    364,951       449,836       (84,885

)

    (19

%)

Data maintenance

    204,725       184,946       19,779       11

%

General and administrative

    658,402       695,899       (37,497

)

    (5

%)

Total expenses

    4,886,635       5,222,447       (335,812

)

    (6

%)

                                 

Income from operations

    516,475       820,271       (303,796

)

    (37

%)

                                 

Other income (expense)

                               

Paycheck protection loan forgiveness income

    684,785       -       684,785       100

%

Paycheck protection loan interest expense

    (5,185

)

    -       (5,185

)

    100

%

Total other income (expense)

    679,600       -       679,600       100

%

                                 

Income before taxes

    1,196,075       820,271       375,804       46

%

Income tax provision

    201,055       270,701       (69,646

)

    (26

%)

                                 

Net income

  $ 995,020     $ 549,570     $ 445,450       81

%

 

Key trends affecting results of operations

 

As noted throughout this annual report, during the years ended December 31, 2021 and 2020, COVID-19 has impacted the businesses of our customers, our business and our results of operations. Most of our clients, and their employees are located in California. Throughout 2020 and for periods of 2021, California had in place COVID-19 restrictions on businesses which resulted in many of our customers reducing their workforces and caused a decrease in the number of new workers’ compensation claims, as a result of fewer workers working. Allowable medical treatment for workers’ compensation claims were also limited to help ease the burden of COVID-19 on medical facilities. We are beginning to see revenues for HCO and MPN enrollment increase as restrictions lift and employers begin hiring, but some of our customers’ industries have been impacted by the recent national trend of workforce resignations and difficulties in hiring. If our customers cannot attract new workers, it is possible that some jobs will be replaced with technology. If technology replaces workers, and/or workplace injuries continue at lower rates because there are more employees working from home and fewer employees suffering injuries in the workplace, the increases in revenues we are beginning to see could flatten or decline.

 

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Our revenues for medical case management were also impacted because there was a smaller labor pool which resulted in fewer new workers’ compensation claims. We believe this trend will be temporary, as the economy recovers from the effects of COVID-19, but if the trend to smaller labor pools continues, medical case management reviews could continue to remain lower in the future.

 

Revenue

 

HCO

 

During the years ended December 31, 2021 and 2020, HCO revenue was essentially flat. The slight decrease in HCO revenue was attributable to the loss of four customers in 2021 and fewer claim network fees from existing customers, partially offset by increases in claim network fees from other existing customers.

 

MPN

 

The 4% increase in MPN revenue for 2021 compared to 2020, resulted primarily from increases in the number of claims reported by existing customers which led to in an increase in the number of MPN claim network fees.

 

Utilization review

 

During the year ended December 31, 2021, utilization review revenue decreased 4%. The decrease in utilization review revenue was due to the loss of three customers, partially offset by increases in utilization review referrals from other customers and the addition of a new customer in 2021.

 

Medical bill review

 

The 21% increase in medical bill review revenue during 2021 was primarily due to an increase in hospital and non-hospital bills reviewed, partially offset by the loss of three customers in 2021.

 

Medical case management

 

During the twelve-month periods ended December 31, 2021 and 2020, revenue from medical case management decreased 26% principally as a result of the loss of two customers, a decrease in the number of new claims, and pauses in work on open claims due to medical treatment delays in 2021. In 2020 and 2021, the decrease in the number of new claims was due to the reduction in our customers’ workforce and COVID-19 business and medical office restrictions. Medical offices were slow to resume full capacity and our medical management nurses could not work on the open claims until medical treatment was provided or was in progress. We believe that as the economy recovers, that medical case management will return to pre-pandemic levels.

 

Other

 

Other fees consist of revenue from network access fees derived from out of network referrals to our network of physicians, claims fees, expert witness testimony, lien representation, legal support services, Medicare set-aside, and workers’ compensation carve-out services. Other fee revenue for the year ended December 31, 2021, decreased 16% when compared to the same period a year earlier. The decrease was the result of a loss of a customer which reduced our claims fees for accessing our network. The claims fees generated by this type of service is no longer offered in the current marketplace. Since losing the customer, we have chosen to discontinue this service in 2021.

 

Expense

 

Salaries and wages

 

Salaries and wages decreased by 6% in 2021 compared to 2020.  This decrease was the result of a reduction in our workforce in 2021 due to a decline in demand for our services caused by the effects of COVID-19 restrictions on our customers.

 

27

 

Professional fees

 

Professional fees decreased marginally during 2021. The decrease in professional fees was primarily the result of fewer fees incurred for board of director’s fees and medical management services as a result of decreased medical case management activity, partially offset by increases in accounting and legal professional fees.

 

Insurance

 

During 2021 we decreased insurance expenses by 8% compared to 2020. The decrease in insurance expenses was primarily attributed to a decrease in medical insurance premiums as a result of our lower employee count and lower insurance expense for business, directors’ and officers’ liability, and Workers’ Compensation coverage.

 

Outsource service fees

 

Outsource service fees decreased 19% during the twelve-month period ended December 2021.  The decrease was primarily the result of decreases in the number of utilization review referrals, medical bill reviews, referrals sent out for Medicare set-aside arrangements, partially offset by increases in medical case management administrative services. We anticipate our outsource service fees will continue to move in correspondence with the level of utilization review, medical bill review, certain medical case management services and Medicare set-aside services we provide in the future.  

 

Data maintenance

 

During the year ended December 31, 2021 data maintenance fees increased 11% primarily as a result of an increase in the number of customers’ employees enrolled in our HCO and MPN programs. In 2021, we saw an increase in the number of MPN enrollees as our customers began hiring employees. We anticipate that as businesses recover from the pandemic that data maintenance fees will increase and then level off to a modest growth.

 

General and administrative

 

During 2021, we were able to reduce our general and administrative expenses by 5%. This decrease was the result of decreases in advertising, dues and subscriptions, equipment/repairs, IT enhancement, licenses and permits, office supplies, parking, postage, printing and reproduction, rent expense for equipment, miscellaneous expenses, and shareholders’ expense, partially offset by increases in charity – cash contribution, auto expenses, bank charges, education, telephone, office rent, travel and entertainment, and vacation expense. These changes in general and administrative expenses were largely attributable to changes in how we conducted our business in response to COVID-19. While we anticipate certain general and administrative expenses will remain lower in the long-term, such as office rent, internet and phone, as a result of changes to our business operations in response to COVID-19, we expect other general and administrative expenses, such as IT enhancements, hardware and other technology-related expenses will remain at higher than historic levels in future periods.

 

Income from Operations

 

The 6% decrease in total expenses we achieved during fiscal 2021 was not sufficient to fully offset the 11% decrease in total revenues during the same period, resulting in a 37% decrease in income from operations during the fiscal year ended December 31, 2021.

 

Other Income (Expense)

 

In February 2021 the principal and interest on the Paycheck Protection Program (“PPP”) loans in the aggregate amount of $460,700 (the “first draw PPP loans”) issued to PHCO, MMC and MMM in April and May 2020 were forgiven in full.  In December 2021 the principal and interest on the section 311 of the Economic Aid Act Paycheck Protection Program Second Draw Loans in the amount of $218,900 (the “second draw PPP loan”) issued to MMM in April 2021 were also forgiven in full. As a result, we realized income from paycheck protection loan forgiveness of $684,785 and loan interest expense from paycheck protection loans of $5,185 during the year ended December 31, 2021, resulting in total other income during 2021 of $679,600. During the year ended December 31, 2020, we realized no other income (expense). We do not expect there to be further similar forgivable loans in future periods and as a result, we expect other income (expense) to be significantly less in future periods than during the year ended December 31, 2021.

 

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Income Tax Provision

 

Our income tax provision for the year ended December 31, 2021, decreased 26%, as a result of a 37% decrease in income from operations during 2021, compared to 2020.

 

Net Income

 

Despite the fact that declines in our total revenues outpaced reductions in our total expenses during 2021, as a result of the recognition in 2021 of PPP loan forgiveness we realized an 81% increase in net income during the year ended December 31, 2021 compared to the year ended December 31, 2020. We do not expect this to recur in future periods and expect net income will be lower in future periods until revenues increase.

 

Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

Liquidity is a measurement of our ability to meet our potential cash requirements for general business purposes. We consistently monitor our liquidity and financial position and take actions management believes are in the best interest of our Company and shareholders to ensure the long-term financial viability of our Company. Historically, we have realized positive cash flows from operating activities, which coupled with positive reserves of cash on hand, have been used to fund our operating expenses and obligations. We have not historically used, nor do we currently possess a credit facility or other institutional source of financing.

 

During the past two fiscal years we have experienced declining revenues as a result of the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on our business, the businesses of our customers and the overall economy.  In April and May 2020, PHCO, MMM and MMC received first draw PPP loans in the aggregate amount of $460,700.  In the spirit of the PPP loan program policy of protecting the continued economic stability of employees, we put virtually all of the PPP loan amounts toward payroll and employee benefit expenses. In February 2021 PHCO, MMC, and MMM received full forgiveness of their first draw PPP loans including accrued interest. In April 2021 MMM received the second draw PPP loan in the amount of $218,900. The second draw PPP loan was also used to pay for qualifying expenses, such as payroll, group health benefits, rent and utilities.  In December 2021 MMM received full forgiveness of the second draw PPP loan including accrued interest.  In addition to availing the Company of the benefits of these government sponsored programs, we have also focused on reducing other operating expenses while maintaining our ability to provide the high-quality care to which our customers are accustomed.  Since the outbreak of the pandemic in early 2020, we have realized a net reduction in our workforce of six employees. At the end of April 2022 the office lease on the business space we currently occupy will expire. We have moved towards operating remotely and have taken this opportunity to reduce our office rent expense.  We are currently in the process of relocating to a smaller office.  The office lease on this new space commenced on April 1, 2022. The operating costs for internet and phone at our offices will be less in the new office space. Some of those savings will be incorporated to enhance our IT security and new internet phone system.

 

Despite the fact that, net of the effects of PPP loan forgiveness, we have realized reduced revenues and lower net cash from operating activities, and the fact that we have incurred expense in transitioning our employees to remote work, we have continued to realize net income and net cash from operations and have increased our net cash position. Management currently believes that absent (i) any unanticipated further COVID-19 impact, (ii) a longer-term downturn in the general economy as a result of inflation and the sanctions, countermeasures and other actions in response to the Russia-Ukraine conflict, or (iii) the loss of several major customers within a condensed period, cash on hand and anticipated revenues from operations will be sufficient to cover our operating expenses for at least the next twelve months.

 

As of December 31, 2021, we had cash on hand of $10,085,372 compared to $9,498,457 at December 31, 2020.  The $586,915 increase in cash on hand was primarily the result of net cash provided by our operating and financing activities, partially offset by cash used in investing activities.

 

We currently have planned certain capital expenditures including moving our corporate offices to a new location and the decommissioning of certain IT systems, implementation of new internet phone services and a move to a new software platform. We do not anticipate these costs to be significant and have adequate capital on hand to cover these expenses. We do not anticipate these expenditures will require us to seek outside sources of funding.

 

29

 

We believe our strong cash position could allow us to identify and capitalize on potential opportunities to expand our business either through the acquisition of existing businesses that may have insufficient resources to overcome the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, including accretion of existing business lines or expansion into new business lines and related industries, including, but not limited to, the insurance industry. We may also seek growth through organic development of new lines of business or expansion of existing offerings. Depending upon the nature of the opportunities we identify, such acquisitions or expansion could require greater capital resources than we currently possess. Should we need additional capital resources, we could seek to obtain such through debt and/or equity financing. We do not currently possess an institutional source of financing and there is no assurance that we could be successful in obtaining equity or debt financing when needed on favorable terms, or at all. We could also use shares of our capital stock as consideration for a business acquisition transaction, but there is also no assurance that there would be significant interest in our capital stock by a potential seller or the market.

 

As a result of the unique nature of the COVID-19 pandemic and its impacts on our operations, the operations of our customers and the broader economy, coupled with uncertainty surrounding the potential impacts rising inflation and the Russia-Ukraine conflict could have, we cannot provide any assurance that the assumptions management has used to estimate our liquidity requirements will remain accurate in either the short-term or the longer-term. The ultimate duration and impact of these events on our business, results of operations, financial condition and cash flows is dependent on future developments, which are our uncertain, largely beyond our control and cannot be predicted with any degree of certainty at this time. However, we expect that our results of operations, including revenues, in future periods will continue to be adversely impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic and potentially by rising inflation and the Russia-Ukraine conflict and their negative effects on economic conditions.

 

Cash Flow

 

During the year ended December 31, 2021, cash was primarily used to fund operations. We had net increases in cash of $586,915 and $1,394,293 during the years ended December 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively. See below for additional, discussion and analysis of cash flow.

 

   

Year Ended December 31,

 
   

2021

   

2020

 

Net cash provided by operating activities

  $ 386,391     $ 987,441  

Net cash used in investing activities

    (18,376

)

    (53,848

)

Net cash provided by financing activities

    218,900       460,700  

Net increase in cash

  $ 586,915     $ 1,394,293  

 

Net cash provided by operating activities was $386,391 and $987,441 in 2021 and 2020, respectively. The decrease of $601,050 in cash flow from operating activities was the result of realizing lower net income coupled with decreases in accounts receivable, bad debt provision, prepaid income tax, receivable – other, deferred taxes, accounts payable, income tax payable, and deferred rent expense, partially offset by increases in taxes receivable, deferred rent asset, prepaid expenses, accrued expenses, and unearned revenue.

 

Net cash used in investing activities was $18,376 and $53,848 in 2021 and 2020, respectively.  Net cash used in investing activities was less by $35,472 in 2021 because of a decrease in purchases of computers, furniture and equipment.

 

In 2021, net cash provided by financing activities was $218,900 from a second draw PPP loan issued to MMM compared to $460,700 of PPP loans issued to PHCO, MMC and MMM, respectively, in 2020.

 

Off-Balance Sheet Financing Arrangements

 

As of December 31, 2021, we had no off-balance sheet financing arrangements.

 

30

 

Inflation

 

We experience pricing pressures in the form of competitive pricing. Insurance carriers and third-party administrators often try to take our customers by offering bundled claims administration services with their own managed care services at a lower rate. We are also impacted by rising costs for certain inflation-sensitive operating expenses such as labor and employee benefits and facility leases. We believe that these impacts can be material to our revenues or net income. Some of our customers are public entities which contract with us at a fixed price for the term of the contract. Increases in labor and employee benefits can reduce our profit margin over the term of these contracts. See also “Effects of inflation” of Item 1A Risk Factor of this annual report.

 

Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates

 

Our consolidated financial statements are prepared in accordance with accounting principle generally accepted in the United States (“GAAP”). Application of these principles requires us to make estimates, assumptions, and judgments that affect the amounts reported in our consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes. We continually evaluate our accounting policies, estimates, and judgments and base our estimates and judgments on historical experience and various other factors that we believe to be reasonable under the circumstances. Because of the inherent uncertainty in making estimates and judgments, actual results could differ from our estimates and judgments. We consider (i) revenue recognition, (ii) leases, (iii) allowance for uncollectible accounts, and (iv) income taxes to be the most critical accounting policies because they relate to accounting areas that require the most subjective or complex judgments by us, and, as such, could be most subject to revision as new information becomes available.

 

Revenue Recognition: We recognize revenue when control of the promised services is transferred to our customers in an amount that reflects the consideration expected to be entitled to in exchange for those services. As we complete our performance obligations which are identified below, we have an unconditional right to consideration as outlined in our contracts with our customers. Generally, our accounts receivable are expected to be collected in 30 days in accordance with the underlying payment terms.

 

We offer multiple services under our managed care and network solutions service lines, which the customer may choose to purchase. These services are billed individually as separate components to our customers. Revenue is recognized as the work is performed in accordance with our customer contracts. Based upon the nature of our products, bundled managed care elements are generally delivered in the same accounting period. Advance payments from subscribers and billings made in advance are recorded on the balance sheet as deferred revenue.

 

Leases: We determine if an arrangement includes a lease at inception. Right-of-use assets represent our right to use an underlying asset for the lease term; and lease liabilities represent our obligation to make lease payments arising from the lease. Right-of-use assets and lease liabilities are recognized at the commencement date of the lease, renewal date of the lease or significant remodeling of the lease space based on the present value of the remaining future minimum lease payments. Leases with a term greater than one year are recognized on the balance sheet as right-of-use assets and short-term and long-term lease liabilities, as applicable.

 

Operating lease liabilities and their corresponding right-of-use assets are initially recorded based on the present value of lease payments over the expected remaining lease term. The interest rate implicit in lease contracts is typically not readily determinable. As a result, we utilize our incremental borrowing rate to discount lease payments, which reflects the fixed rate at which we could borrow on a collateralized basis the amount of the lease payments in the same currency, for a similar term, in a similar economic environment. Our leases may include options to extend or terminate the lease which are included in the lease term when it is reasonably certain that we will exercise any such options. Lease expense for lease payments is recognized on a straight-line basis over the lease term.

 

Allowance for Uncollectible Accounts: We determine our allowance for uncollectible accounts by considering a number of factors, including the length of time trade accounts receivable are past due, our previous loss history, the customers’ current ability to pay its obligation to us, and the condition of the general economy and the industry as a whole. We write off accounts receivable when they become uncollectible.

 

31

 

We must make significant judgments and estimates in determining contractual and bad debt allowances in any accounting period. One significant uncertainty inherent in our analysis is whether our past experience will be indicative of future periods. Although we consider future projections when estimating contractual and bad debt allowances, we ultimately make our decisions based on the best information available to us at the time the decision is made. Adverse changes in general economic conditions or trends in reimbursement amounts for our services could affect our contractual and bad debt allowance estimates, collection of accounts receivable, cash flows, and results of operations. Three customers accounted for 10% or more of accounts receivable at December 31, 2021 and 2020.

 

Accounting for Income Taxes: We record a tax provision for the anticipated tax consequences of our reported results of operations. The provision for income taxes is computed using the asset and liability method, under which deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the expected future tax consequences of temporary differences between the financial reporting and tax bases of assets and liabilities, and for operating losses and tax credit carryforwards. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using the currently enacted tax rates that apply to taxable income in effect for the years in which those tax assets are expected to be realized or settled. We record a valuation allowance, if necessary, to reduce deferred tax assets to the amount that is believed more likely than not to be realized.

 

We recognize tax benefits from uncertain tax positions only if it is more likely than not that the tax position will be sustained on examination by the taxing authorities, based on the technical merits of the position. The tax benefits recognized in the financial statements from such positions are then measured based on the largest benefit that has a greater than 50% likelihood of being realized upon ultimate settlement.

 

Management believes it is more likely than not that forecasted income, including income that may be generated as a result of certain tax planning strategies, together with future reversals of existing taxable temporary differences, will be sufficient to fully recover the deferred tax assets. In the event we determine all, or part of the net deferred tax assets are not realizable in the future, we will make an adjustment to the valuation allowance that would be charged to earnings in the period such determination is made. In addition, the calculation of tax liabilities involves significant judgment in estimating the impact of uncertainties in the application of GAAP and complex tax laws. Resolution of these uncertainties in a manner inconsistent with management’s expectations could have a material impact on our financial condition and operating results. The significant assumptions and estimates described above are important contributors to our ultimate effective tax rate in each year.

 

ITEM 7A.         QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURE ABOUT MARKET RISK

 

Smaller reporting companies are not required to provide the information required by this Item. 

 

32

 

 

ITEM 8.           FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA

 

REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM (PCAOB ID 6117)

 

To the Board of Directors and Stockholders

Pacific Health Care Organization, Inc.

Newport Beach, CA

 

Opinion on the Financial Statements

 

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of Pacific Health Care Organization, Inc. (the Company) as of December 31 2021 and 2020, and the related consolidated statements of operations,  stockholders’ equity, and cash flows for the years then ended, and the related notes (collectively referred to as the consolidated financial statements). In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Company as of December 31, 2021 and 2020, and the results of its operations and its cash flows for the years then ended, in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

 

Basis for Opinion

 

These consolidated financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company’s consolidated financial statements based on our audits. We are a public accounting firm registered with the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) (PCAOB) and are required to be independent with respect to the Company in accordance with the U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the PCAOB.

 

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audits to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the consolidated financial statements are free of material misstatement, whether due to error or fraud. The Company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting. As part of our audit, we are required to obtain an understanding of internal control over financial reporting, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion.

 

Our audits included performing procedures to assess the risks of material misstatement of the consolidated financial statements, whether due to error or fraud, and performing procedures that respond to those risks. Such procedures included examining, on a test basis, evidence regarding the amounts and disclosures in the consolidated financial statements. Our audits also included evaluating the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the consolidated financial statements. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

 

Critical Audit Matters

 

Critical audit matters are matters arising from the current period audit of the consolidated financial statements that were communicated or required to be communicated to the audit committee and that (1) relate to accounts or disclosures that are material to the consolidated financial statements and (2) involved our especially challenging, subjective, or complex judgments. We determined that there were no critical audit matters.

 

/s/ Pinnacle Accountancy Group of Utah

 

We have served as the Company’s auditor since 2017.

 

Pinnacle Accountancy Group of Utah

(a dba of Heaton & Company, PLLC)

Farmington, Utah

April 12, 2022

 

33

 

Pacific Health Care Organization, Inc.

Consolidated Balance Sheet

 

ASSETS

 
   

December 31,

   

December 31,

 
   

2021

   

2020

 

Current Assets

               

Cash

  $ 10,085,372     $ 9,498,457  

Accounts receivable, net of allowance of $23,083 and $19,404

    927,990       1,063,090  

Deferred rent assets

    10,055       -  

Income tax receivable

    19,779       -  

Receivable – other

    3,000       4,000  

Prepaid expenses

    96,977       82,499  

Total current assets

    11,143,173       10,648,046  
                 

Property and Equipment, net

               

Computer equipment

    526,249       507,873  

Furniture and fixtures

    226,323       226,323  

Office equipment

    9,556       9,556  

Total property and equipment

    762,128       743,752  

Less: accumulated depreciation and amortization

    (669,592

)

    (620,705

)

Net property and equipment

    92,536       123,047  

Operating lease right-of-use assets, net

    70,368       309,282  

Other assets

    26,788       26,788  

Total Assets

  $ 11,332,865     $ 11,107,163  
                 

LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS EQUITY

 
                 

Current Liabilities

 

Accounts payable

  $ 44,899     $ 80,134  

Accrued expenses

    315,495       275,152  

Income tax payable

    -       61,828  

Deferred rent expense

    -       2,725  

Dividend payable

    37,000       37,000  

Operating lease liabilities, current portion

    70,368       243,049  

Paycheck protection program loans, current portion

    -       311,118  

Unearned revenue

    33,544       31,544  

Total current liabilities

    501,306       1,042,550  
                 

Long Term Liabilities

               

Operating lease liabilities, long term portion

    -       66,233  

Paycheck protection program loans, long term portion

    -       149,582  

Deferred tax liabilities

    7,154       19,413  

Total Liabilities

    508,460       1,277,778  
                 

Commitments and Contingencies

    -       -  
                 

Stockholders Equity

               

Preferred stock; 5,000,000 shares authorized at $0.001 par value of which 40,000 shares designated as Series A preferred and 16,000 shares issued and outstanding

    16       16  

Common stock, $0.001 par value, 800,000,000 shares authorized,

12,800,000 shares issued and outstanding

    12,800       12,800  

Additional paid-in capital

    416,057       416,057  

Retained earnings

    10,395,532       9,400,512  

Total stockholders’ equity

    10,824,405       9,829,385  
                 

Total Liabilities and Stockholders’ Equity

  $ 11,332,865     $ 11,107,163  

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these audited consolidated financial statements.

 

34

 

Pacific Health Care Organization, Inc.

Consolidated Statement of Operations

 

   

Years Ended December 31,

 
   

2021

   

2020

 

Revenues

               

HCO

  $ 1,449,345     $ 1,453,365  

MPN

    524,148       502,590  

Utilization review

    1,091,792       1,142,796  

Medical bill review

    368,721       305,510  

Medical case management

    1,771,718       2,404,148  

Other

    197,386       234,309  

Total revenues

    5,403,110       6,042,718  
                 

Expenses

               

Depreciation

    48,887       55,428  

Bad debt provision

    15,656       20,101  

Consulting fees

    237,582       253,181  

Salaries and wages

    2,740,806       2,916,576  

Professional fees

    293,936       295,358  

Insurance

    321,690       351,122  

Outsource service fees

    364,951       449,836  

Data maintenance

    204,725       184,946  

General and administrative

    658,402       695,899  

Total expenses

    4,886,635       5,222,447  
                 

Income from operations

    516,475       820,271  
                 

Other income (expense)

               

Paycheck protection program loan forgiveness income

    684,785       -  

Paycheck protection program loan interest expense

    (5,185

)

    -  

Total other income (expense)

    679,600       -  
                 

Income before taxes 

    1,196,075       820,271  

Income tax provision

    201,055       270,701  
                 

Net income 

  $ 995,020     $ 549,570  
                 

Basic earnings per share: 

               

Earnings per share amount

  $ 0.08     $ 0.04  

Basic common shares outstanding

    12,800,000       12,800,000  
                 

Fully diluted earnings per share:

               

Earnings per share amount

  $ 0.08     $ 0.04  

Fully diluted common shares outstanding

    12,816,000       12,816,000  

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these audited consolidated financial statements.

 

35

 

Pacific Health Care Organization, Inc.

Consolidated Statements of Stockholders Equity

 

   

Preferred Stock

   

Common Stock

   

Paid in

    Retained    

Total

Stockholders’

 
   

Shares

   

Amount

   

Shares

   

Amount

   

Capital

   

Earnings

   

Equity

 

Balance December 31, 2019

    16,000     $ 16       12,800,000     $ 12,800     $ 416,057     $ 8,850,942     $ 9,279,815  
                                                         

Net income for the year ended December 31, 2020

    -       -       -       -       -       549,570       549,570  
                                                         

Balance December 31, 2020

    16,000     $ 16       12,800,000     $ 12,800     $ 416,057     $ 9,400,512     $ 9,829,385  
                                                         

Net income for the year ended December 31, 2021

    -       -       -       -       -       995,020       995,020  
                                                         

Balance December 31, 2021

    16,000     $ 16       12,800,000     $ 12,800     $ 416,057     $ 10,395,532     $ 10,824,405  

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these audited consolidated financial statements.

 

36

 

Pacific Health Care Organization, Inc.

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows

 

   

Years ended December 31,

 
   

2021

   

2020

 

Cash Flows from Operating Activities

               

Net income

  $ 995,020     $ 549,570  

Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities:

               

Depreciation

    48,887       55,428  

Bad debt provision

    15,656       20,101  

Paycheck protection program loan forgiveness

    (679,600

)

    -  
                 

 Changes in operating assets and liabilities:

               

Decrease in accounts receivable

    119,444       31,534  

Increase in deferred rent asset

    (10,055

)

    -  

Decrease in receivable - other

    1,000       10,900  

(Increase) decrease in prepaid expenses

    (14,478

)

    45,844  

(Decrease) increase in accounts payable

    (35,235

)

    27,859  

Increase in accrued expenses

    40,343       25,248  

Decrease in deferred rent expense

    (2,725

)

    (27,222

)

Increase (decrease) in unearned revenue

    2,000       (14,522

)

Increase in taxes receivable

    (19,779

)

    -  

Decrease (increase) in prepaid income tax

    -

 

    158,641  

(Decrease) increase in deferred taxes

    (12,259

)

    42,232  

(Decrease) increase in income tax payable

    (61,828

)

    61,828  
                 

Net cash provided by operating activities

    386,391       987,441  
                 

Cash Flows from Investing Activities

               

Purchase of furniture and equipment

    (18,376

)

    (53,848

)

Net cash used in investing activities

    (18,376

)

    (53,848

)

                 

Cash Flows from Financing Activities

               

         Proceeds from paycheck protection program loans

    218,900       460,700  

Net cash provided by financing activities

    218,900       460,700  

Increase in cash

    586,915       1,394,293  
                 

Cash at beginning of period

    9,498,457       8,104,164  

Cash at end of period

  $ 10,085,372     $ 9,498,457  

Supplemental Cash Flow Information

               

Cash paid for:

               

Interest

  $ -     $ -  

Income taxes

  $ 294,000     $ 8,000  

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these audited consolidated financial statements.

 

37

 

Pacific Health Care Organization, Inc.

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

Years Ended December 31, 2021 and 2020

 

NOTE 1 – CORPORATE HISTORY

 

Pacific Health Care Organization, Inc. (the “Company” or “PHCO”) is a specialty workers’ compensation cost containment company providing a range of services principally to California employers and claims administrators.  The Company was incorporated under the laws of the state of Utah in April 1970, under the name Clear Air, Inc.  The Company changed its name to Pacific Health Care Organization, Inc., in January 2001.  In February 2001, the Company acquired Medex Healthcare, Inc. (“Medex”), a California corporation organized in March 1994, in a share for share exchange.  Medex is a wholly owned subsidiary of the Company. Medex is in the business of managing and administering both Health Care Organizations (“HCOs”) and Managed Provider Networks (“MPNs”) in the state of California.  Medex also offers carve-out services and Medicare Set Asides (“MSA”).  In February 2012, we incorporated Medex Medical Management, Inc., (“MMM”) in the state of Nevada, as a wholly owned subsidiary of the Company.  MMM is responsible for overseeing and managing medical case management services and lien representation services. In March 2011, we incorporated Medex Managed Care, Inc. (“MMC”) in the state of Nevada, as a wholly owned subsidiary of the Company.  MMC oversees and manages the Company’s utilization review and managed bill review services. 

 

On October 19, 2021, the Company completed short-form mergers between PHCO and each of its wholly owned subsidiaries Industrial Resolutions Coalition (“IRC”), Medex Legal Support, Inc. (“MLS”), and Pacific Medical Holding Company (“PMHC”). As a result of the short-form mergers the separate existence of IRC, MLS and PMHC terminated and the business, assets and liabilities of those entities have been transferred to PHCO and, as appropriate to its other subsidiaries. The Company continues to offer the services of IRC and MLS through its other subsidiaries as described in the preceding paragraph.

 

NOTE 2 – SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

 

A.    Basis of Accounting

 

The Company used the accrual method of accounting in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States for the periods ended December 31, 2021 and 2020.

 

B.    Revenue Recognition

 

Revenue Recognition — The Company recognizes revenue in accordance with ASU 2014-09, “Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606).” The core principle underlying Topic 606 is that the Company will recognize revenue to represent the transfer of goods and services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the Company expects to be entitled in such exchange. This will require the Company to identify contractual performance obligations and determine whether revenue should be recognized at a point in time or over time, based on when control of goods and services transfers to a customer.

 

The core principle underlying Topic 606 is that the Company will recognize revenue to represent the transfer of goods and services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the Company expects to be entitled in such exchange. This will require the Company to identify contractual performance obligations and determine whether revenue should be recognized at a point in time or over time, based on when control of goods and services transfers to a customer.

 

The ASU requires the use of a five-step model to recognize revenue from customer contracts. The five-step model requires that the Company (i) identify the contract with the customer, (ii) identify the performance obligations in the contract, (iii) determine the transaction price, including variable consideration to the extent that it is probable that a significant future reversal will not occur, (iv) allocate the transaction price to the respective performance obligations in the contract, and (v) recognize revenue when (or as) the Company satisfies the performance obligation. Revenues are generated as services are provided to the customer based on the sales price agreed and collected. The Company recognizes revenue as the time is worked or as units of production are completed, which is when the revenue is earned and realized. Labor costs are recognized as the costs are incurred.

 

38

 

Pacific Health Care Organization, Inc.

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

Years Ended December 31, 2021 and 2020

 

The Company derives its revenue from the sale of services offered through its HCOs, MPNs, utilization review, medical bill review, medical case management services, lien defense, carve-outs, Medicare set-aside. These services are billed individually as separate components to our customers. These fees include monthly and/or annual HCO and/or MPN administration fees, claim and network access fees, medical bill review fees, legal support fees, Medicare set-aside fees, lien service fees, workers’ compensation carve-outs, utilization review fees, medical case management flat rate fees or hourly fees depending on the agreement with the customer.

 

The Company enters into arrangements for bundled managed care, standalone services, or add-on ancillary services which includes various units of accounting such as network solutions and patient management, including managed care. Such elements are considered separate units of accounting due to each element having value to the customer on a stand-alone basis and are billed separately. The selling price for each unit of accounting is determined using the contract price. When the Company’s customers purchase several products the pricing of the products sold is generally the same as if the products were sold on an individual basis. Revenue is recognized as the work is performed in accordance with the Company’s customer contracts. Based upon the nature of the Company’s products, bundled managed care elements are generally delivered in the same accounting period. The Company recognizes revenue for patient management services ratably over the life of the customer contract. Based upon prior experience in managed care, the Company estimates the deferral amount from when the customer’s claim is received to when the customer contract expires. Advance payments from subscribers and billings made in advance are recorded on the balance sheet as deferred revenue.

 

C.    Cash Equivalents

 

The Company considers all short term, highly liquid investments that are readily convertible, within three months of origination, to known amounts as cash equivalents.  As of December 31, 2021 and 2020, the Company had no cash equivalents.

 

D.    Concentrations of Credit Risk

 

Financial instruments that potentially subject the Company to concentrations of credit risks consist of cash and cash equivalents.  The Company places its cash and cash equivalents at well-known, quality financial institutions.  At times, such cash and investments may be in excess of the FDIC insurance limit.

 

E.    Earnings Per Share of Common Stock

 

The computation of earnings per share of common stock is based on the weighted average number of shares outstanding at the date of these audited consolidated financial statements. The fully diluted earnings per share includes 16,000 shares of Series A preferred stock, as disclosed in Section L of Note 2.

 

   

For the Years Ended

December 31,

 
   

2021

   

2020

 

Basic Earnings per share:

               

Income (numerator)

  $ 995,020     $ 549,570  

Shares (denominator)

    12,800,000       12,800,000  

Per share amount

  $ 0.08     $ 0.04  

Fully Diluted Earnings per share:

               

Income (numerator)

  $ 995,020     $ 549,570  

Shares (denominator)

    12,816,000       12,816,000  

Per share amount

  $ 0.08     $ 0.04  

 

39

 

Pacific Health Care Organization, Inc.

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

Years Ended December 31, 2021 and 2020

 

F.     Depreciation

 

The cost of property and equipment is depreciated over the estimated useful lives of the related assets.  The cost of leasehold improvements is depreciated over the lesser of the length of the lease of the related assets or the estimated lives of the assets.  Depreciation is computed on the straight-line method which is five years for computer equipment, office equipment, and furniture and fixtures.

 

G.    Use of Estimates

 

The preparation of the financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the amounts reported in these audited consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes.  Actual results could differ from those estimates. Significant estimates include the values assigned to the allowance for doubtful accounts and accruals for income taxes.

 

H.    Principles of Consolidation

 

The accompanying audited consolidated financial statements include the accounts of the Company and its wholly owned subsidiaries.  Intercompany transactions and balances have been eliminated in consolidation.

 

I.     Fair Value of Financial Instruments

 

The Company applies ASC 820, “Fair Value Measurements.” This guidance defines fair value, establishes a three-level valuation hierarchy for disclosures of fair value measurement and enhances disclosure requirements for fair value measures. The three levels are defined as follows:

 

•         Level 1 inputs to the valuation methodology are quoted prices (unadjusted) for identical assets or liabilities in active markets.

•         Level 2 inputs to the valuation methodology include quoted prices for similar assets and liabilities in active markets, and inputs that are observable for the asset or liability, either directly or indirectly, for substantially the full term of the financial instrument.

•         Level 3 inputs to valuation methodology are unobservable and significant to the fair measurement.

 

The carrying amounts reported in the balance sheets for cash and cash equivalents, receivables and current assets and liabilities each qualify as financial instruments and are a reasonable estimate of fair value because of the short period of time between the origination of such instruments and their expected realization and their current market rate of interest.

 

J.     General and Administrative Expenses

 

General and administrative expenses include fees for advertising, charity, rent expense for office, shareholders’ expense, auto expenses, bank charges, dues and subscriptions, education, equipment/repairs, IT enhancement and internet expenses, licenses and permits, office supplies, parking, postage and delivery, printing and reproduction, rent expense for equipment, telephone, rent-expense, shareholders’ expense, travel expenses and entertainment costs, and compensated absences.

 

K.    Income Taxes

 

The Company utilizes the asset and liability method of accounting for income taxes.  Under this method, deferred tax assets and liabilities are provided based on the difference between the financial statements and tax basis of assets and liabilities measured by the currently enacted tax rates in effect for the years in which these differences are expected to reverse.  Deferred tax expense or benefit is the result of changes in deferred tax assets and liabilities.

 

40

 

Pacific Health Care Organization, Inc.

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

Years Ended December 31, 2021 and 2020

 

L.    Capital Structure

 

On January 6, 2020, the Company effected a four-shares-for-one-share (4:1) forward stock split (“Forward Split”) of its common stock and its Series A preferred stock. Unless otherwise noted, impacted amounts, share and per share information included in the financial statements and notes thereto have been retroactively adjusted for the Forward Split as if such Forward Split occurred on the first day of the first period presented.

 

The Company has two classes of stock. The Articles of Incorporation of the Company, as amended, authorize 5,000,000 shares of $0.001 par value preferred stock, which may be issued in one or more series, with designation, rights and privileges of such preferred stock to be set by the board of directors of the Company from time to time.  On November 21, 2016, the board of directors of the Company approved a Certificate of Designation of Rights, Privileges and Preferences of Series A preferred stock and authorized the Company’s officers to file such with the Utah Division of Corporations and Commercial Code to create the Series A preferred stock.  The Series A preferred stock has a par value of $0.001 and consists of 40,000 shares.  The holders of Series A preferred stock are entitled to vote with the common stockholders on all matters brought for approval of the common stockholders.  In connection with any such matter, each outstanding share of Series A preferred stock is entitled to 20,000 votes of common stock of the Company.  In the event of a liquidation, dissolution or winding up of the Company, the Series A preferred stock shall rank in parity with the Company’s common stock.  Holders of Series A preferred stock are entitled to receive dividends, when, as and if declared by the board of directors.  The Series A preferred stock shall rank in parity with the Company’s common stock as to any dividends.  As of December 31, 2021 and 2020, 16,000 shares of the Series A preferred stock were outstanding.

 

The Company also has voting common stock of 800,000,000 shares authorized at December 31, 2021 and 2020, and 12,800,000 and 12,800,000 shares issued and outstanding, respectively. The Company purchased no shares of treasury stock at cost during fiscal 2021 or 2020. As of December 31, 2021 and 2020, the Company had dividends payable of $37,000 and $37,000, respectively, from a dividend declared in September 2015.  As of December 31, 2021 and 2020, no shareholder entitled to claim the unpaid September 2015 dividend made a claim to such dividend, accordingly the Company paid $0 and $0, respectively during in connection with the September 2015 dividend during the years ended December 31, 2021 and 2020.

 

M.   Share Based Compensation

 

The Company has adopted the fair value method of accounting for stock-based employee and non-employee compensation in accordance with statement of ASC Topic 718, “Compensation – Stock Compensation” which requires that equity-based payments (to the extent they are compensatory) be recognized in these audited consolidated statements of operations based on their fair value at grant date.

 

N.    Trade Receivables

 

In the normal course of business, the Company extends credit to its customers on a short-term basis.  Although the credit risk associated with these customers is minimal, the Company routinely reviews its accounts receivable balances and makes provisions for doubtful accounts.  The Company ages its receivables by date of invoice. Management reviews bad debt reserves quarterly and reserves specific accounts as warranted or sets up a general reserve based on amounts over 90 days past due.  When an account is deemed uncollectible, the Company charges off the receivable against the bad debt reserve. A considerable amount of judgment is required in assessing the realization of these receivables including the current creditworthiness of each customer and related aging of the past-due balances, including any billing disputes. In order to assess the collectability of these receivables, the Company performs ongoing credit evaluations of its customers’ financial condition.

 

41

 

Pacific Health Care Organization, Inc.

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

Years Ended December 31, 2021 and 2020

 

Through these evaluations, the Company may become aware of a situation where a customer may not be able to meet its financial obligations due to deterioration of its financial viability, credit ratings or bankruptcy. The allowance for doubtful accounts is based on the best information available to the Company and is reevaluated and adjusted as additional information is received. The Company evaluates the allowance based on historical write-off experience, the size of the individual customer balances, past-due amounts and the overall national economy. At fiscal year-end 2021 and 2020, the Company had a bad debt reserve of $23,083 and $19,104, respectively, as a general reserve for certain balances over 90 days past due and for accounts that are potentially uncollectible.

 

The percentages of the amounts due from major customers to total accounts receivable as of December 31, 2021 and 2020, are as follows:

 

   

12/31/21

   

12/31/20

 

Customer A

    24

%

    20

%

Customer B

    11

%

    9

%

Customer C

    11

%

    10

%

 

O.    Major Customers

 

The Company provides services to insurers, third party administrators, self-administered employers, municipalities and other industries.  The Company can provide a full range of services to virtually any size employer in the state of California.  The Company is also able to provide utilization review, medical bill review and medical case management services both inside and outside the state of California.

 

During 2021, three major customers accounted for more than 43% of our sales, approximately 24%, 11%, and 8% respectively, of our total sales. By comparison, during 2020 our three largest customers accounted for 42% of sales, approximately 20%, 12%, and 10%, respectively.

 

P.     Leases

 

Effective January 1, 2019, the Company adopted the guidance of ASC 842, Leases, which requires an entity to recognize a right-of-use asset and a lease liability for virtually all leases. The adoption of ASC 842 on January 1, 2019 resulted in the recognition of operating lease right-of-use assets of $719,861, lease liabilities for operating leases of $719,861, and a zero cumulative-effect adjustment to accumulated deficit. This lease expires as of April 30, 2022. The Company elected to exclude from its balance sheets recognition of leases having a term of 12 months or less (“short-term leases”). Lease expense is recognized on a straight-line basis over the lease term. If a Company lease does not provide an implicit rate, the Company develops an estimated incremental borrowing rate at the commencement date based on the estimated rate at which it would borrow, in the current economic environment, an amount equal to the lease payments over a similar term on a collateralized basis which is used to determine the present value of lease payments. The Company entered into a new office lease for a 12-month period, which commenced on April 1, 2022. The Company had no finance leases at December 31, 2021 and 2020.

 

Q.    Subsequent Events

 

In accordance with ASC 855-10 Company management reviewed all material events through the date of issuance and except as follows, there are no material subsequent events to report. As of the date of issuance of the financial statements, it is difficult to determine the impact the COVID-19 outbreak will continue to have on the Company. The extent of its impact will depend upon future developments that are highly uncertain and cannot currently be predicted with any level of confidence. The Company expects the recovery resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic may continue to have a material adverse effect on its business, results of operations, financial condition, and cash flows in one or more future quarters. During the pandemic, our customers had to reduce their workforces and our revenues are derived from their employee counts and workplace injuries. Some of our customers’ industries workforce moved away from those jobs, which may result in slower increase in their workforce to pre-pandemic levels.

 

42

 

Pacific Health Care Organization, Inc.

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

Years Ended December 31, 2021 and 2020

 

As a result of the economic contraction from the COVID-19 pandemic, workers’ compensation claims, and medical reviews received were lower in the years covered because of the decline in prior workplace injuries. Our medical case managers usually work on the difficult claims, which can remain open for several months to years. Without the steady flow of new workers’ compensation claims during that time, we expect that our medical case management revenue may continue to be lower throughout 2022, even as more people return to the workforce.

 

The Company has entered into a new 12-month office lease commencing on April 1, 2022. Our office current lease expires as of April 30, 2022.

 

The Company continues to monitor the COVID-19 situation. No impairments were recorded as of the balance sheet date as no triggering events or changes in circumstances had occurred as of year-end; however, due to significant uncertainty surrounding the situation, management's judgment regarding this could change in the future. In addition, while the Company’s results of operations, cash flows and financial condition could be negatively impacted, the extent of the impact cannot be reasonably estimated at this time.

 

NOTE 3 RECENTLY ISSUED ACCOUNTING STANDARDS         

 

Recently Issued Accounting Standards

 

In December 2019, the FASB issued ASU 2019-12, “Simplifying the Accounting for Income Taxes”. The pronouncement simplifies the accounting for income taxes by removing certain exceptions to the general principles in ASC Topic 740, “Income Taxes”. The pronouncement also improves consistent application of and simplify GAAP for other areas of Topic 740 by clarifying and amending existing guidance. This standard became effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2020, with early adoption permitted. The reported results for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2021 and 2020 reflect the application of the guidance of ASC 740-10.

 

Other than the foregoing, the Company has reviewed all recently issued, but not yet effective, accounting pronouncements and does not believe the future adoption of any such pronouncements will be expected to cause a material impact on its financial statements.

 

NOTE 4 – FIXED ASSETS

 

The Company capitalizes the purchase of equipment and fixtures for major purchases more than $1,000 per item.  Capitalized amounts are depreciated over the useful life of the assets using the straight-line method of depreciation which is five years for computer equipment, office equipment, and furniture and fixtures. Scheduled below are the assets, costs and accumulated depreciation at December 31, 2021 and 2020.

 

   

Cost 

   

Accumulated Depreciation

and Amortization

 

Assets

 

December 31,

2021

   

December 31,

2020

   

December 31,

2021(1)

   

December 31,

2020

 

Computer equipment

  $ 526,249     $ 507,873     $ 441,597     $ 405,849  

Furniture and fixtures

    226,323       226,323       206,884       206,446  

Office equipment

    9,556       9,556       21,111       8,410  

Totals

  $ 762,128     $ 743,752     $ 669,592     $ 620,705  

 

(1)         Depreciation and amortization expense for the years ended December 31, 2021 and 2020, totaled $48,887 and $55,428, respectively.

 

43

 

Pacific Health Care Organization, Inc.

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

Years Ended December 31, 2021 and 2020

 

NOTE 5 INCOME TAXES

 

The Company accounts for corporate income taxes in accordance with ASC 740-10 “Income Taxes.” ASC 740-10 requires an asset and liability approach for financial accounting and reporting for income tax purposes.

 

The tax provision for the years ended December 31, 2021 and 2020, consisted of the following:

 

   

2021

   

2020

 

Current

               

Federal

  $ 101,118     $ 152,702  

State

    112,196       75,766  

Deferred

               

Federal

    (9,304

)

    31,693  

State

    (2,955

)

    10,540  

Total tax provision

  $ 201,055     $ 270,701  

 

Deferred income taxes reflect the net tax effects of temporary differences between the carrying amounts of assets and liabilities for financial reporting purposes and the amounts used for income tax purposes.  The Company’s total deferred tax liabilities, deferred tax assets, and deferred tax asset valuation allowances at December 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, are as follows:

 

   

2021

   

2020

 

Depreciation

               

Federal

  $ (19,215

)

  $ (25,840

)

State

    (6,391

)

    (8,592

)

                 

Reserve for bad debts

               

Federal

    4,793       4,075  

State

    1,594       1,355  
                 

Deferred Rent

               

Federal

    2,088       572  

State

    694       190  
                 

Deferred Revenues

               

Federal

    6,965       6,624  

State

    2,317       2,203  
                 

State tax deductions

    -       -  

Net deferred tax asset (liabilities)

  $ (7,155

)

  $ (19,413

)

 

The reconciliation of income tax computed at statutory rates of income tax benefits is as follows: 

 

   

2021

   

2020

 
                 

Expense at federal statutory rate of 21%

  $ 251,176     $ 172,257  

State income taxes, net of federal benefit

    79,789       57,285  

Non-deductible expenses

    10,063       10,027  

Tax exempt income

    (143,805

)

    -  

Other items

    3,832       31,132  

Income tax provision

  $ 201,055     $ 270,701  

 

44

 

Pacific Health Care Organization, Inc.

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

Years Ended December 31, 2021 and 2020

 

The Company follows ASC 740, Income Taxes, which clarifies the accounting for uncertainty in income taxes recognized in a company’s financial statements and requires a company to determine whether it is more likely than not that a tax position will be sustained upon examination based upon the technical merits of the position.  If the more-likely-than-not threshold is met, a company must measure the tax position to determine the amount to recognize in the financial statements.  

 

The Company follows the interpretations of the ASC 740, which establishes a single model to address accounting for uncertain tax positions.  The interpretations clarify the accounting for income taxes by prescribing a minimum recognition threshold a tax position is required to meet before being recognized in the financial statements and provide guidance on derecognition, measurement, classification, interest and penalties, accounting in interim periods, disclosure and transition.

 

The Company takes a two-step approach to recognizing and measuring uncertain tax positions.  The first step is to evaluate the tax position for recognition by determining if the weight of available evidence indicates that it is more likely than not that the tax position will be sustained on audit, including resolution of any related appeals or litigation processes.  The second step is to measure the tax benefit as the largest amount that is more than 50% likely of being realized upon effective settlement.  The Company re-evaluates its income tax positions on a quarterly basis to consider factors such as changes in facts or circumstances, changes in or interpretations of tax law, effectively settled issues under audit, and new audit activity.  Such a change in recognition or measurement would result in recognition of a tax benefit or an additional charge to the tax provision.  Interest and penalties on unrecognized tax benefits are classified as income tax expense.

 

The Company includes interest and penalties arising from the underpayment of income taxes in these audited consolidated statements of operations in the provision for income taxes.  As of December 31, 2021, the Company had no accrued interest or penalties. The years 2019, 2020, and 2021 are still open for examination by the Internal Revenue Service.

 

NOTE 6 LEASES

 

In April 2017, the Company entered a 39-month operating lease for an office copy machine with monthly payments at $1,723. This lease terminated in July 2020. 

 

In July 2015, the Company entered a 79-month office lease that commenced on September 28, 2015 through April 30, 2022.  The lease provided for approximately 9,439 square feet of office space.  This office space has served as the principal executive offices of the Company, as well as the principal offices of the Company’s operating subsidiaries.

 

The Company has entered a new 12-month office lease that commenced on April 1, 2022. The lease provides 320 square feet of office space that includes shared space for other business needs and expires March 31, 2023. This office space will serve as the principal executive offices of the Company, as well as the principal offices of the Company’s operating subsidiaries. The Company has reduced its office space as the majority of its workforce will continue working remotely. The new office space will be for the executive team and shared office space for key employees to use as needed.

 

Operating lease right-of-use (“ROU”) assets and liabilities are recognized at commencement date based on the present value of lease payments over the lease term. ROU assets represent our right to use an underlying asset for the lease term and lease liabilities represent our obligation to make lease payments arising from the lease. Generally, the implicit rate of interest in arrangements is not readily determinable and the Company utilizes its incremental borrowing rate in determining the present value of lease payments. The Company’s incremental borrowing rate is a hypothetical rate based on its understanding of what its credit rating would be. The operating lease ROU asset includes any lease payments made and excludes lease incentives.

 

45

 

Pacific Health Care Organization, Inc.

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

Years Ended December 31, 2021 and 2020

 

The components of lease expense and supplemental cash flow information related to leases for the period are as follows:

 

   

Year Ended

December 31, 2021

 

Lease Cost

       

Operating lease cost (included in general and administrative in the Company’s consolidated statement of operations)

  $ 71,359  
         

Other Information

       

Cash paid for amounts included in the measurement of lease liabilities for the year ended December 31, 2021

  $ 279,385  

Weighted average remaining lease term – operating leases (in years)

 

0.33 years

 

Average discount rate – operating leases

    5.75 %

 

The supplemental balance sheet information related to leases for the period is as follows:

 

   

At December 31, 2021

   

At December 31, 2020

 

Operating leases

               

Remaining right-of-use assets

  $ 70,368     $ 309,282  

Short-term operating lease liabilities

  $ 70,368     $ 243,049  

Long-term operating lease liabilities

    -       66,233  

Total operating lease liabilities

  $ 70,368     $ 309,282  

 

Maturities of the Company’s undiscounted lease liabilities are as follows:

 

Year Ending

 

Operating Leases

 

2022

  $ 71,359  

Total lease payments

    71,359  

Less: Imputed interest/present value discount

    (991

)

Present value of lease liabilities

  $ 70,368  

 

Lease expenses were $279,385 and $257,024 during the years ended December 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively.

 

NOTE 7 ACCRUED AND OTHER LIABILITIES

 

As of December 31, 2021 and 2020, accrued liabilities consist of the following:

 

   

2021

   

2020

 
                 

Salaries and wages

  $ 115,744     $ 91,693  

Compensated absences

    154,774       135,530  

Legal fees

    815       -  

Accounting fees

    26,372       21,577  

Sales commissions

    12,989       25,699  

Other

    4,801       653  

Total

  $ 315,495     $ 275,152  

 

46

 

Pacific Health Care Organization, Inc.

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

Years Ended December 31, 2021 and 2020

 

NOTE 8 EQUITY INCENTIVE AWARDS

 

2018 Plan

 

The Pacific Health Care Organization 2018 Equity Incentive Plan (the “2018 Plan”) became effective on April 6, 2018. The 2018 Plan permits the granting of 8,000,000 shares of Common Stock. No awards or grants have been awarded or granted under the Plan. The 2018 Plan provides for grants of equity incentive compensation to employees and consultants of the Company and such other individuals the Company reasonably expects to become employees or consultants of the Company. The 2018 Plan allows for awards of (a) incentive stock options, (b) non-qualified stock options, (c) stock appreciation rights, (d) restricted awards, and (e) other equity-based awards. The 2018 Plan will terminate automatically on the tenth anniversary of the 2018’s Plan Effective Date. The 2018 Plan is currently administered by the full board of directors.

 

The Company did not award any equity incentive compensation during the years ended December 31, 2021 and 2020.

 

NOTE 9 COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES

 

From time to time, the Company may become involved in various lawsuits and legal proceedings which arise in the ordinary course of business.  Litigation is subject to inherent uncertainties, and an adverse result in such matters may arise from time to time that may harm the Company’s business.  To the knowledge of management, there is no material litigation or governmental agency proceeding pending or threatened against the Company or any of its subsidiaries. Further, the Company is not aware of any material proceeding to which any director, member of senior management or owner of record or beneficially of more than five percent of any class of voting securities of the Company, or any associate of any of them is a party adverse to or has a material interest adverse to the Company or any of its subsidiaries.

 

NOTE 10 – BENEFITS AND OTHER COMPENSATION

 

The Company offers a 401(k)-profit sharing plan for employees who meet the eligibility requirements. Pursuant to the plan, the Company may make discretionary matching contributions and/or discretionary profit-sharing contributions to the plan.  All such contributions must comply with federal pension laws, non-discrimination requirements and the terms of the plan.  In determining whether to make a discretionary contribution, the board of directors would evaluate current and prospective costs of such awards to the Company and management’s desire to reward and retain employees and attract new employees.  To date, the Company has never made matching contributions and/or discretionary profit-sharing contributions to any plan.

 

 

47

 

ITEM 9.         CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE

 

None.

 

ITEM 9A.         CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

 

Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures

 

Disclosure controls and procedures, as defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e) under the Exchange Act, are designed to provide reasonable assurance that information required to be disclosed by a company in the reports it files or submits under the Exchange Act is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the Commission’s rules and forms. Disclosure controls and procedures include, without limitation, controls and procedures designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed by a company in the reports it files or submits under the Exchange Act is accumulated and communicated to the company’s management, including its principal executive and principal financial officers, as appropriate to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure.

 

Our management, with the participation of our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, evaluated the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures as of the end of the period covered by this annual report.  Based on the evaluation of our disclosure controls and procedures as of December 31, 2021, the end of the period covered by this annual report, our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures were effective at a reasonable assurance level.

 

Managements Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting

 

Our management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting as defined in Rule 13a-15(f) or 15d-15(f) under the Exchange Act. Management conducted an assessment of the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting based on the criteria set forth by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO) in Internal Control-Integrated Framework (2013).  Based on this assessment, management has concluded that our internal control over financial reporting is effective as of December 31, 2021, to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements in accordance with GAAP.  

 

This report does not include an attestation report of our registered public accounting firm regarding internal control over financial reporting. Management’s report was not subject to attestation by our registered public accounting firm pursuant to rules of the Commission that permit us to provide only management’s report in this report.

 

Changes in Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

 

There were no changes in our internal control over financial reporting that occurred during the quarter ended December 31, 2021, that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

 

Inherent Limitations on Effectiveness of Controls

 

Our management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer does not expect that our disclosure controls and procedures or our internal control over financial reporting will prevent all errors and all fraud.  A control system, no matter how well conceived and operated, can provide only reasonable, not absolute, assurance that the objectives of the control system are met.  Further, the design of a control system must reflect the fact that there are resource constraints, and the benefits of controls must be considered relative to their costs.  Because of the inherent limitations in all control systems, no evaluation of controls can provide absolute assurance that all control issues and instances of fraud, if any, have been detected.  These inherent limitations include the realities that judgments in decision-making can be faulty, and that breakdowns can occur because of a simple error or mistake.  Additionally, controls can be circumvented by individual acts, by collusion of two or more people or by management override of the controls.  The design of any system of controls also is based in part upon certain assumptions about the likelihood of future events, and there can be no assurance that any design will succeed in achieving its stated goals under all potential future conditions; over time, controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or the degree of compliance with policies or procedures may deteriorate.  Because of the inherent limitations in a cost-effective control system, misstatements due to error or fraud may occur and not be detected.

 

48

 

ITEM 9B.         OTHER INFORMATION

 

None.

 

ITEM 9C.         DISCLOSURE REGARDING JURISDICTIONS THAT PREVENT INSPECTIONS

 

None.

 

 

 

49

 

PART III

 

ITEM 10.           DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

 

The following table sets forth our executive officers and directors, their ages, and all offices and positions they hold with the Company as of April 11, 2022.  There is no agreement or understanding between the Company or any other person and any director or executive officer pursuant to which he or she was selected as a director or executive officer.

 

Name

 

Age

 

Positions with the Company

 

Director Since

 

Executive Officer Since

                 

Tom Kubota

 

82

 

Chief Executive Officer, President and Chairman

of the Board of Directors

 

Sept. 2000

 

Sept. 2000

                 

Kristina Kubota

 

37

 

Chief Financial Officer, Secretary and Director

 

Feb. 2018

 

Jan. 2021

                 

David Wang

 

59

 

Director

 

Nov. 2007

   
                 

Stacy Hadley

 

54

 

Director

 

Nov. 2016

   
                 

Günter Soraperra

 

62

 

Director

 

Nov. 2016

   
                 

Lauren Kubota

 

39

 

Director and Risk Manager

 

Feb. 2018

   

 

Tom Kubota.  Since 2000, Mr. Kubota has been primarily engaged in the operations of the Company.  Mr. Kubota also has over thirty years of experience in the investment banking, securities and corporate finance field. He held the position of Vice President at Drexel Burnham Lambert; at Stem, Frank, Meyer and Fox; and at Cantor Fitzgerald.  Mr. Kubota also founded Nanko Investments, Inc. and Laurkat Inc., in 1996 and 2018, respectively, which specialized in providing capital formation services to high tech and natural resources companies.  Mr. Kubota served as president of each firm from the time they were founded until 2019 when he elected to shutter their respective operations. He has expertise in counseling emerging public companies and has previously served as a director of both private and public companies. Mr. Kubota is not currently, nor has he in the past five years been, a nominee or director of any other SEC registrant.  In concluding that Mr. Kubota was an appropriate candidate to serve on the Company’s board of directors, the board considered his experience as the Company’s president and chief executive officer, his many years of investment banking and corporate finance experience and his prior management experience.

 

Kristina Kubota.  Ms. Kubota was appointed Chief Financial Officer in January 2021. Prior to being appointed as Chief Financial Officer, Ms. Kubota had served as the Company’s Controller and Secretary since November 2017, where her primary responsibilities included general ledger accounting, analyzing and reconciling accounts and records for service lines, verifying revenues, expenses and other accounting functions. Ms. Kubota joined the Company as a Quality Assurance Auditor in January 2014.  As a Quality Assurance Auditor, she was responsible for developing and auditing policies and procedures, developing and implementing data analyses and reporting capabilities that optimize statistical efficiency and quality. She has also developed and implemented policies and procedures which resulted in MMC receiving full accreditation for Workers’ Compensation Utilization Review Management from URAC.  Ms. Kubota earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in Finance from California State University, Northridge in 2012.  Ms. Kubota is not currently, nor has she in the past five years been, a nominee or director of any other SEC registrant.  In determining that Ms. Kubota was a suitable candidate to serve on the Board, the Board considered her educational background, URAC accreditation and financial and accounting experience, including her knowledge of data and statistical analytics skills.   

 

50

 

David Wang Since January 2021, Mr. Wang has been managing a private investment portfolio consisting of stocks, options and futures.  Previously, from 2018 to 2020 he served as the Co-CEO of Hacknowledge, LLC.  Hacknowledge shuttered its operations in December 2020, as a result of the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on its business. Hacknowledge offered a Managed Detection and Response (MDR) cybersecurity solution. Mr. Wang was responsible for day-to-day operations of the company including business development, marketing and sales. From late 2013 to 2017, Mr. Wang served as a managing member of Reef Capital Management, LLC.  He was responsible for managing a fund that was created to generate long-term cash flow to investors by investing primarily in drilling and development of oil projects. Prior to joining Reef Capital Management, from 2010, Mr. Wang was a consultant to high tech companies. He assisted a cloud computing company expand its coverage outside of Asia and assisted a cell phone manufacturer explore a joint venture with a manufacturer in Brazil to build low-cost smart phones and tablets utilizing various government tax incentives. Mr. Wang earned a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science/Mathematics from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) in 1985. He earned a Master of Business Administration degree with an emphasis in Financial and Entrepreneurial Studies from the Anderson School at UCLA in 2000. Mr. Wang is not currently, nor has he in the past five years been, a nominee or director of any other SEC registrant. In concluding that Mr. Wang was an appropriate candidate to serve on the Company’s board of directors, the board considered his education background, his experience in entrepreneurial business enterprises, his understanding of cybersecurity issues and his favorable history of attracting venture capital funds through his established contacts in the investment banking community.

 

Stacy Hadley.   Mrs. Hadley has over 30 years of accounting and audit experience. She is employed as Chief Financial Officer of Radius Engineering, Inc. Her current responsibilities include overseeing and implementing the Company’s financial management, forecasting, financial reporting, job costing and financial transactions, regulatory compliance, supply chain and facilities management. She was employed with Now CFO, a provider of outsourced accounting and financial solutions, from September 2015 through March 2021. Mrs. Hadley was a Partner at Now CFO. She was responsible for consulting services in Houston, Texas and Salt Lake City, Utah overseeing projects and serving as Controller/CFO for various companies. From November 2014 to September 2015, Mrs. Hadley was employed by Harman International as a Compliance and Financial Consultant where, among other things, she oversaw compliance reporting of four business units and divisional shared services, worked with finance directors to implement and document internal control testing, and documented procedures to ensure adherence with company policies and internal controls. From December 2012 to November 2014, Mrs. Hadley served as the Controller for Dalbo Holdings where she was responsible for general ledger accounting, analyzing and reconciling accounts and records for service lines, verifying revenues, expenses and other accounting functions. Mrs. Hadley received licensure as a Certified Public Accountant in July 2014. Mrs. Hadley received a Bachelor of Science Degree in Accounting and a Masters Degree in Accounting from Weber State University, Utah in 2010 and 2012, respectively. During the past five years Mrs. Hadley has not served, and she does not currently serve, as a director of any other SEC registrant or any registered investment company. The board of directors considered Mrs. Hadley’s years of accounting and auditing experience both with accounting firms, and in-house with a number of different employers, as well as her educational background and her CPA licensure in concluding that she is qualified to serve on the Company’s board of directors.

 

Günter Soraperra.   Mr. Soraperra has served as the Chief Executive Officer of Traunkristall Design since 2000. Traunkristall specializes in the design, production, and sale of high-end hand-made crystal products and has business activities in more than 25 countries. Among other things, Mr. Soraperra is responsible for setting strategy and direction, allocation of capital, and overseeing sales and marketing at Traunkristall. Mr. Soraperra received a Master of Business Administration degree from the University of Graz, Austria in 1990. Over the past fifteen years Mr. Soraperra has also served as a Senior Vice President of a private Swiss investment group responsible for coordinating international activities, financing and mergers and acquisitions. He has also served on the advisory boards of various international companies. In the past five years Mr. Soraperra has not served, and he does not currently serve, as a director of any other SEC registrant or any registered investment company. In concluding that Mr. Soraperra was qualified to serve on the Company’s board of directors, the board considered Mr. Soraperra’s years of strategy, management, finance and operational experience.

 

51

 

Lauren Kubota. Ms. Kubota joined the Company in June 2014. As the Risk Manager, Ms. Kubota currently directs risk management activities, where she identifies and mitigates legal, insurance, financial, security, disaster recovery and business continuity, human resources, vendor, and other business risks. In this capacity, Ms. Kubota is responsible for developing and implementing policies, procedures, and best practices to comply with applicable laws and regulations, contract terms, and other best business practices essential to the continued successful operation of the Company. She has also developed and implemented numerous initiatives in client retention, government relations, vendor management, SOP and report reform, project management, sales and marketing, information technology, information security, premises improvement, systems optimization, accreditation, employee recruitment and retention, leadership training, employee engagement, communications, and other business elementals whose improvement tends to ameliorate risk to the Company. During her employment with the Company, Ms. Kubota has also served in project-based roles, sometimes concurrently, as an Account Manager (3.5 years), Quality Assurance Auditor (6 months), and in launching the Company’s Workers’ Compensation Lien Defense service line (6 months). Ms. Kubota is an attorney licensed to practice law in California. She earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science from the University of California, San Diego in 2005 and a Juris Doctor from the University of California, Hastings College of the Law in 2011. She was appointed to the board of directors of the Company in February 2018. Ms. Kubota is not currently, nor has she in the past five years, been a nominee or director of any other SEC registrant. In determining that Ms. Kubota was a suitable candidate to serve on the Company’s board of directors, the board considered her educational background and legal experience, as well as her knowledge of and comprehensive participation in the policies, operations and risk management of the Company. From January 2018 to December 2020, Ms. Kubota served on the volunteer board of directors of the Pasadena Roving Archers Heritage, Inc. a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, as the Director of Public Relations. This nonprofit corporation is not an SEC registrant.

 

Family Relationships

 

Lauren Kubota and Kristina Kubota are sisters and are daughters of Tom Kubota.

 

Code of Ethics

 

Our board of directors has adopted a code of ethics that applies to our principal executive officer, principal financial officer, principal accounting officer or controller and to persons performing similar functions. The code of ethics is designed to deter wrongdoing and to promote (i) honest and ethical conduct, including the ethical handling of actual or apparent conflicts of interest between personal and professional relationships, (ii) full, fair, accurate, timely and understandable disclosure in reports and documents we file with, or submit to, the Commission and in other public communications we make, (iii) compliance with applicable governmental laws, rules and regulations, (iv) prompt internal reporting of violations of the code, and (v) accountability for adherence to the code.  We will provide a copy of our code of ethics, without charge, to any person upon receipt of written request for such delivered to our corporate headquarters.  All such requests should be sent care of Pacific Health Care Organization, Inc., Attn: Corporate Secretary, 1201 Dove Street, Suite 300, Newport Beach, CA 92660.  A copy of our code of ethics has been posted on our website and may be viewed at www.pacifichealthcareorganization.com. If we make any substantive amendments to, or grant any waivers from, the code of ethics for any officer or director, we will disclose the nature of such amendment or waiver on our website or in a Current Report on Form 8-K.

 

Involvement in Certain Legal Proceedings

 

Our directors and our executive officers have not been involved in or a party in any of the following events or actions during the past ten years:

 

 

any bankruptcy petition filed by or against any business of which such person was a general partner or executive officer either at the time of the bankruptcy or within two years prior to that time;

 

any conviction in a criminal proceeding or being subject to a pending criminal proceeding (excluding traffic violations and other minor offenses);

 

being subject to any order, judgment, or decree, not subsequently reversed, suspended or vacated, of any court of competent jurisdiction, permanently or temporarily enjoining, barring, suspending or otherwise limiting his involvement in any type of business, securities or banking activities; or

 

being found by a court of competent jurisdiction (in a civil action), the Commission or the Commodity Futures Trading Commission to have violated a federal or state securities or commodities law, and the judgment has not been reversed, suspended, or vacated.

 

52

 

 

such person was found by a court of competent jurisdiction in a civil action or by the Commission to have violated any Federal or State securities law, and the judgment in such civil action or finding by the Commission has not been subsequently reversed, suspended, or vacated;

 

such person was found by a court of competent jurisdiction in a civil action or by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission to have violated any Federal commodities law, and the judgment in such civil action or finding by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission has not been subsequently reversed, suspended or vacated;

 

such person was the subject of, or a party to, any Federal or State judicial or administrative order, judgment, decree, or finding, not subsequently reversed, suspended or vacated, relating to an alleged violation of: (i) Any Federal or State securities or commodities law or regulation; or (ii) Any law or regulation respecting financial institutions or insurance companies including, but not limited to, a temporary or permanent injunction, order of disgorgement or restitution, civil money penalty or temporary or permanent cease-and-desist order, or removal or prohibition order; or (iii) Any law or regulation prohibiting mail or wire fraud or fraud in connection with any business entity; or

 

such person was the subject of, or a party to, any sanction or order, not subsequently reversed, suspended or vacated, of any self-regulatory organization (as defined in Section 3(a)(26) of the Exchange Act (15 U.S.C. 78c(a)(26))), any registered entity (as defined in Section 1(a)(29) of the Commodity Exchange Act (7 U.S.C. 1(a)(29))), or any equivalent exchange, association, entity or organization that has disciplinary authority over its members or persons associated with a member.

 

Committees of the Board of Directors

 

The OTCQB does not require us to have a separately designated standing audit committee, a compensation committee or a nominating and corporate governance committee.  Our board of directors has determined that it is in the Company’s best interest to have the full board fulfill the functions that would be performed by these committees.

 

While we do not currently have a standing audit committee, our board of directors believes that were it to establish an audit committee, Mrs. Hadley would qualify as an independent director and possesses the attributes necessary to be considered an “audit committee financial expert” under the rules adopted by the Commission pursuant to the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.

 

Procedures for Security Holders to Nominate Candidate to the Board of Directors

 

There have been no material changes to the procedures by which shareholders may recommend nominees to our board of directors since March 30, 2012, the date we last provided information regarding our director nomination process.

 

53

 

ITEM 11.         EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION

 

The table below summarizes compensation paid to or earned by our named executive officers (“NEOs”) for the years ended December 31, 2021 and 2020.  No other executive officer of the Company had total compensation of $100,000 or more during the year ended December 31, 2021.

 

Summary Compensation Table

 

Name and

Principal Position

 

Year

 

Salary

($)

   

Bonus

($)

   

All Other

Compensation

($)

     

Total

($)

 

Tom Kubota

 

2021

   

194,136

     

-

     

15,714

(1)

     

209,850

 

Chief Executive Officer,

 

2020

   

184,045

     

102

     

43,503

(2)

     

227,650

 

President and Director

                                     
                                       

Kristina Kubota

 

2021

   

117,183

     

-

     

11,686

(3)

     

128,869

 

Chief Financial Officer,

 

2020

   

89,305

     

109

     

11,704

(4)

     

101,118

 
Secretary and Director                                      

 

(1) Reflects health insurance premiums of $4,848, auto expense of $5,049, director’s fees of $3,600 and phone/internet reimbursement of $2,217.                   

(2) Reflects health insurance premiums of $4,092, auto expense of $4,435, director’s fees of $4,100, reimbursement of phone/internet fees of $450 and partial payout of unused paid time off of $30,426.

(3) Reflects health insurance premiums of $4,819, director’s fees and board meeting secretary fees of $4,650 and phone/internet reimbursement of $2,217.

(4) Reflects director's and board meeting secretary fees of $5,150, reimbursement of phone/internet fees of $450 and unused paid time off of $6,104.

 

Narrative Disclosure to Summary Compensation Table

 

Employment Agreements

 

We do not have written employment agreements with Mr. Kubota or Ms. Kubota. Each of our NEOs is employed/retained on an at-will basis and each can terminate his/her employment arrangement at any time, with or without cause. Likewise, we can terminate their employment at any time, with or without cause.

 

Base Salary

 

Base salary is used to recognize the experience, skills, knowledge and responsibilities required of our NEOs. The base salary for each NEO is typically set at the time the individual is hired based on the factors discussed in the preceding sentence and the negotiation process between us and the NEO. We also take into consideration the individual’s past performance and experience, the expertise we need and local market and labor conditions. Changes to base salary, if any, are determined based on several factors, including evaluation of performance, anticipated financial performance of the Company, economic condition and local market and labor conditions. Mr. Kubota’s base salary for 2022 is $193,536. Ms. Kubota’s base salary for 2022 is $115,000.

 

54

 

Non-Equity Incentive Compensation

 

From time to time, we may make cash awards to our employees, including the NEOs. Such awards may be designed to incentivize employees over a specified period pursuant to pre-established, performance-based criteria, the accomplishment of which is substantially uncertain at the time the criteria are established. In the event this type of cash award is made, it would be reflected in the “Summary Compensation Table” under a separate column entitled “Nonequity Incentive Plan Compensation.” The criteria for earning non-equity incentive bonuses may be based on corporate financial performance measures that would be developed by our board of directors at the time such non-equity incentive plan is established. Our board has discretion to determine the applicable performance measures and the appropriate weighting of such measures at the time it establishes any non-equity incentive plan. Our board of directors did not establish non-equity incentive compensation plans during the years ended December 31, 2021 or 2020, and no non-equity incentive compensation was awarded during these years. Similarly, to date, the board of directors has not awarded non-equity incentive compensation for the year ending December 31, 2022, although there is nothing that prohibits the board of directors from doing so at any point during the 2022 fiscal year.

 

Bonuses

 

We may also make cash awards to employees that are not part of any pre-established, performance-based criteria. Awards of this type are completely discretionary and subjectively determined by our board of directors at the time they are awarded. To the extent awards are made to our NEOs, such awards are reported in the “Summary Compensation Table” in the column entitled “Bonus.”

 

The Company is under no contractual or other obligation to award cash bonuses. During the year ended December 31, 2021, the board of directors did not award any bonuses. During the year ended December 31, 2020, the board of directors awarded total aggregate bonuses of $211 respectively to our NEOs.

 

Equity Incentive Compensation

 

Our equity incentive award program is a vehicle we may use to offer long-term incentives to our employees. From time to time, we may also make equity incentive awards to our NEOs, employees, and consultants in the form of stock options, restricted stock grants or some other form of equity award. Equity incentive awards are reflected in the “Summary Compensation Table” under the columns entitled “Stock Awards” and “Option Awards” as appropriate.

 

Our board of directors has no obligation to award equity incentive compensation. That does not mean the board of directors may not, as it deems appropriate, award equity incentive compensation when it deems such to be appropriate in the future.

 

During the years ended December 31, 2021 or 2020, our board of directors awarded no equity incentive compensation to our NEOs. To date, the board of directors has also not awarded equity incentive compensation to our NEOs for the year ending December 31, 2022, although there is nothing that prohibits the board of directors from doing so at any point during the 2022 fiscal year.

 

Benefits and Other Compensation

 

We currently provide health care benefits, including medical, vision and dental insurance, subject to certain deductibles and co-payments to our full-time employees. We also provide for paid time off (“PTO”), which includes vacation, sick leave and other out-of-the-office time and is accrued and paid in accordance with our PTO policy. We may also provide group life and disability insurance to employees who are eligible to participate in such programs.

 

We offer a 401(k)-profit sharing plan for employees who meet the eligibility requirements. Pursuant to the plan, we may make discretionary matching contributions and/or discretionary profit-sharing contributions to the plan. All such contributions must comply with federal pension laws, non-discrimination requirements and the terms of the plan. In determining whether to make a discretionary contribution, the board of directors would evaluate current and future prospects and management’s desire to reward and retain employees and attract new employees. To date, we have never made matching contributions and/or discretionary profit-sharing contributions to any plan.

 

55

 

Other than the foregoing, we do not offer any retirement or other benefit plans to our employees, including our NEOs, however, the board of directors may adopt plans as it deems to be reasonable under the circumstances.

 

Our NEOs are entitled to participate, if eligible under such benefit plans, in any insurance programs we offer to our employees, are eligible for PTO and to participate in such other fringe benefit programs as we may make available to our other employees.

 

Nonqualified Deferred Compensation

 

We offer no defined contribution or other plan that provides for the deferral of compensation on a basis that is not tax-qualified to any of our employees including our NEOs.

 

Pension Benefits

 

We offer no pension or other specified retirement payments or benefits, including but not limited to tax-qualified deferred benefit plans and supplemental executive retirement plans to our NEOs.

 

Termination and Change in Control

 

We do not have agreements, plans or arrangements, written or unwritten, with any of our NEOs that would provide for payments or other benefits to any of our NEOs following, or in connection with, the resignation, retirement or other termination of any NEO or change in control of the Company or a change in the responsibilities of any NEO following a change in control of the Company.

 

OUTSTANDING EQUITY AWARDS AT FISCAL YEAR-END

 

As of December 31, 2021, there were no outstanding equity awards held by our NEOs.

 

None of our NEOs exercised any stock options or had any stock vest related to grants made in connection with their employment during the years ended December 31, 2021 or 2020.

 

DIRECTOR COMPENSATION

 

We offer cash compensation to attract and retain candidates to serve on our board of directors.

 

Meeting Fees

 

All directors receive a fee of $1,200 and the recording secretary receives a fee of $350 per meeting for each meeting attended either in person or telephonically.  Additionally, all directors are paid $1,000 for attendance at the annual meeting of stockholders, plus airfare and hotel expense. 

 

Equity Compensation

 

We do not currently have a fixed plan for the award of equity compensation to our directors, and we did not award any equity compensation to any of our directors during the year ended December 31, 2021.

 

56

 

Director Compensation Table

 

The following table sets forth a summary of the compensation we paid to our directors for services on our board during the year ended December 31, 2021.

 

Name

 

Fees Earned or Paid in Cash ($)

 

All Other

Compensation ($)

 

Total ($)

 

Tom Kubota

  $ 3,600       $ 206,250   (1)   $ 209,850  
                             

David Wang

  $ 3,600       $ -       $ 3,600  
                             

Günter Soraperra

  $ 3,600       $ -       $ 3,600  
                             

Stacy Hadley

  $ 3,600       $ -       $ 3,600  
                             

Lauren Kubota

  $ 3,600       $ 105,903   (2)   $ 109,503  
                             

Kristina Kubota

  $ 4,650   (3)   $ 124,219   (2)   $ 128,869  

 

(1)    Mr. Kubota is employed as the Company’s Chief Executive Officer and President.  For details regarding All Other Compensation paid to Mr. Kubota, please see “Summary Compensation Table” above.

(2)   Lauren and Kristina Kubota are employees of the Company. These amounts reflect their salaries and other benefits they receive in connection with their employment. Effective January 29, 2021, Kristina Kubota was appointed Chief Financial Officer of the Company.

(3)   Kristina Kubota was paid additional fees of $1,050 to act as recording secretary at meetings of the board of directors.

 

ITEM 12.         SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS

 

The following table sets forth, as of April 11, 2022:

 

 

each person known to us to beneficially own more than 5% of our common stock or Series A preferred stock;

 

each of our named executive officers;

 

each member of our board of directors; and

 

all our directors and executive officers as a group.

 

On April 11, 2022, there were 12,800,000 shares of common stock issued and outstanding and 16,000 shares of Series A preferred stock issued and outstanding.

 

Beneficial ownership is determined in accordance with the rules of the Commission. These rules generally attribute beneficial ownership of securities to persons who possess sole or shared voting power or investment power with respect to such securities.  Except as otherwise indicated, the persons or entities listed below have sole voting and investment power with respect to all shares of the Company’s common stock and Series A preferred stock beneficially owned by them, except to the extent this power may be shared with a spouse.

 

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Unless otherwise indicated, the address of each person or entity named in the table is 2618 San Miguel Drive #477 Newport Beach, CA 92660.

 

   

Common Stock

Beneficially Owned(1)

   

Series A Preferred Stock

Beneficially Owned(2)

 

Name of Beneficial Owner

 

Number

   

%

   

Number

   

%

 
                                 

Directors and Named Executive Officers:

                               

Tom Kubota(3)

    8,025,000       62.7

%

    16,000       100

%

Kristina Kubota(3)

    8,000       *

%

    --       --

%

Lauren Kubota(3)

    8,000       *

%

    --       --

%

Stacy Hadley

    --       --

%

    --       --

%

Günter Soraperra

    --       --

%

    --       --

%

David Wang

    --       --

%

    --       --

%

All directors and executive officers as a group (6 persons)

    8,041,000       62.8

%

    16,000       100

%

                                 

5% Shareholders:

                               

Donald P. Balzano(4)

    878,640       6.9

%

    --       --

%

5422 Michelle Drive

                               

Torrance, CA 90503

                               

Bruce and Sarah Everakes(5)

    690,856       5.4

%

    --       --

%

3442 River Falls Dr.

                               

Northbrook, IL 60062

                               

 

* Less than 1%.

(1)       Excludes shares of common stock that may be deemed to be beneficially owned by such persons due to their beneficial ownership of Series A preferred stock, which are convertible to common stock on a one-share-for-one-share basis at any time at the election of the holder.

(2)       Each share of Series A preferred stock is convertible to common stock on a one-share-for-one-share basis at any time at the election of the holder. Each share of Series A preferred stock entitles its holder to vote together with the common stock as a single class on all matters presented to the Company’s common stockholders for their vote. Each outstanding share of Series A preferred stock votes as 20,000 shares of common stock. The Series A preferred stock ranks in parity with the common stock on a per share basis, not on a per vote basis, as to any dividends, liquidation, dissolution or winding up of the Company.

(3)       Mr. Kubota holds the shares in the Tom Kubota Revocable Trust of 2013 (the “Trust”).  Mr. Kubota is the sole Trustee and settlor of the Trust.  As such he may be deemed to have voting and/or investment power over the shares held by the Trust and therefore may be deemed to be the beneficial owner of those shares. Kristina Kubota and Lauren Kubota are currently beneficiaries of the Trust. As the Trust is revocable, Mr. Kubota could revoke the Trust or change its beneficiaries at any time. Kristina Kubota and Lauren Kubota have no voting or investment power over the shares held by the Trust. If Mr. Kubota is unable or unwilling to serve in the office of Trustee, the Trust documents currently provide that Kristina Kubota and Lauren Kubota would serve as successor co-trustees of the Trust.

(4)       Mr. Balzano is a Company consultant.

(5)       Based solely on the Amendment No. 1 to Schedule 13G filed by Bruce Everakes on February 15, 2019, adjusted to reflect the four-shares-for-one-share forward split of the Company’s common stock that took effect on January 6, 2020.

 

58

 

Equity Compensation Plans 

 

Plan category

 

Number of securities to be issued upon exercise of outstanding options, warrants and rights

   

Weighted

average exercise price of outstanding options, warrants and rights

   

Number of securities remaining available for future issuance under equity compensation plans (excluding securities reflected in column (a))

 
   

(a)

   

(b)

   

(c)

 

Equity compensation plans approved by security holders

    -     $ -       8,000,000

Equity compensation plans not approved by security holders

    -     $ -       -  

Total

    -     $ -       8,000,000

 

* Adjusted to reflect the four-shares-for-one-share forward split of the Company’s common stock that took effect on January 6, 2020.

 

ITEM 13.         CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS, AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE

 

Except as disclosed in Item 11 Executive Compensation, during the years ended December 31, 2021 and 2020, we did not engage in transactions with related persons (as defined by Rule 404 of Regulation S-K (Instructions to Item 404(a)) that exceeded the lesser of $120,000 or 1% of the average of our total assets at year-end for the last two fiscal years in which any such related person had or will have a direct or indirect material interest.

 

Director Independence

 

The board has determined that as of date of this annual report, that Mrs. Hadley, Mr. Soraperra and Mr. Wang would qualify as “independent directors” as that term is defined in the listing standards of the NYSE American.  Such independence definition includes a series of objective tests, including that the director is not an employee of the company and has not engaged in various types of business dealings with the company.  In addition, the board of directors has made a subjective determination as to each independent director that no relationships exist which, in the opinion of the board of directors, would interfere with the exercise of independent judgment in carrying out the responsibilities of a director.

 

ITEM 14.           PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTING FEES AND SERVICES

 

Fees for professional services provided by Pinnacle Accountancy Group of Utah, (a dba of Heaton & Company, PLLC), our independent registered public accounting firm during the years ended December 31, 2021 and 2020, in each of the following categories, were as follows:

 

   

2021

   

2020